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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which is STRONGER?)
 
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Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (which is stronger?) Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are both considered STRONG intramolecular forces. But do you know which is stronger? You'd think this was a straightforward question. But there's more to it! Each of these bonds has a range of strengths. In this video, we'll discuss how the strength of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds are measured so you can compare two chemical bonds. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:25 Definitions of ionic and covalent bonds 1:45 Measuring the strength of ionic bonds (lattice energy) 3:08 Some typical lattice energies of ionic bonds 3:50 Measuring the strength of covalent bonds (bond enthalpy) 4:19 Some typical bond enthalpies of covalent bonds Here are our more in-depth videos about the individual bonds. Ionic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Covalent Bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow3 Metallic Bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons Picture Credits: Butter http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Western-pack-butter.jpg Author: Steve Karg, aka Skarg sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaC... Author: Raj6
Views: 45986 Socratica
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1784854 CrashCourse
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 42941 Socratica
Bond Strength and Bond Length
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into bond strength and bond length of single bonds, double bonds, and triple bonds. It also discusses the relative strength of sigma bonds and pi bonds. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 410084 Beverly Biology
Concept at your tips - Ionic and Covalent Bond - ( In Hindi ) - Easy and fast way to learn
 
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in this video you will learn easy and fast way to remember Ionic and covalent bond with a small trick. in this you will also learn what is anion and cation ? please channel ko subscribe karey https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIUatIgOsHrko9SNv_dQczw Please Like and follow us for more update Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/technikclass/ instagram: https://www.instagram.com/technikclasses/
Views: 22231 Technik Classes
Ionic VS Covalent Bonds: Rap Battle!
 
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Hi! I'm Anesha and this is my channel, Likeable Science. As the name probably tells you, the purpose of my videos is to make science likeable! Using humor, visual learning, time-lapse, raps, and songs, Likeable Science videos are based on a middle/high school curriculum, and help you to learn quickly in a fun and interesting way! If you like science, check out Likeable STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) at our website: https://www.likeableSTEM.com Likeable STEM includes this channel and others like Likeable Computing to teach all about computer science. Visit the Likeable STEM website for volunteering opportunities, chances to write in our blog, and for more learning opportunities! You better brace yourself for Likeable Science's first rap battle: ionic VS covalent bonds! This rap battle will give you all the information you need to distinguish the differences between ionic and covalent bonds. Enjoy!
Views: 1686 Likeable Science
Ionic and Covalent Bonds Made Easy
 
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Simple explanation of Ionic and Covalent Bonds music from bensound.com sunny day from soundbible.com wind from soundbible.com
Views: 92467 Got Science?
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 268259 RicochetScience
SINGLE, DOUBLE, & TRIPLE COVALENT BONDS
 
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Description
Views: 25010 Walter Jahn
Ionic Bond | #aumsum
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1217163 It's AumSum Time
Chemical Bonds
 
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This clip provides an overview of chemical bonds, explaining that a chemical bond is not a physical structure but an energy relationship that involves interactions between the electrons of the reacting atoms. The clip also discusses the various types of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent and hydrogen).
Views: 2431 INTELECOM
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 101152 Whats Up Dude
Sigma and Pi bonds
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. In chemistry, sigma bonds (σ bonds) are the strongest type of covalent chemical bond.[1] They are formed by head-on overlapping between atomic orbitals. Sigma bonding is most clearly defined for diatomic moleculesusing the language and tools of symmetry groups. In this formal approach, a σ-bond is symmetrical with respect to rotation about the bond axis. By this definition, common forms of sigma bonds are s+s, pz+pz, s+pz and dz2+dz2 (where z is defined as the axis of the bond).[2] Quantum theory also indicates that molecular orbitals (MO) of identical symmetry actually mix. As a practical consequence of this mixing of diatomic molecules, thewavefunctions s+s and pz+pz molecular orbitals become blended. The extent of this mixing (or blending) depends on the relative energies of the like-symmetry MO's In chemistry, pi bonds (π bonds) are covalent chemical bonds where two lobes of one involved atomic orbital overlap two lobes of the other involved atomic orbital. Each of these atomic orbitals is zero at a shared nodal plane, passing through the two bonded nuclei. The same plane is also a nodal plane for the molecular orbital of the pi bond.
Views: 120445 7activestudio
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
4.2 Covalent bond is an electrostatic attraction [SL IB Chemistry]
 
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4.2.1 Describe the covalent bond as the electrostatic attraction between a pair of electrons and positively charged nuclei. Elements with a high electronegativity will tend to share electrons when they bond -- since they both "love" electrons. Electrons may pair up in between the atomic nuclei to form a covalent bond. The positive nuclei have an electrostatic (opposite charges attract) attraction to the pairs. More pairs of electrons means more of an attraction and therefore stronger (multiple) bonds.
Views: 38389 Richard Thornley
Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar)
 
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Chemistry: What is a Covalent Bond? (Polar and Nonpolar) Covalent bonds are one of the 3 main types of intramolecular forces, along with ionic bonds and metallic bonds. Covalent bonds are the result of atoms sharing their valence electrons. Covalent bonds can be polar or nonpolar, depending on the electronegativies of the atoms involved in the bond. We show five examples of covalent bonds using Lewis dot structure notation: HF, CO2, H2, H2O and CCl4. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:28 Definition of a Covalent Bond 0:42 Example 1: HF (single covalent bond) 1:23 Example 2: CO2 (double covalent bond) 2:09 Nonpolar covalent bonds 2:20 Example 3: H2 2:43 Polar covalent bonds 2:48 Example 4: H2O 3:58 Example 5: CCl4 4:39 Pauling Bond Polarity Scale (Linus Pauling) 5:15 Do covalent bonds break apart in water? (electrolytes) Click to watch our video about ionic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UWsJRL Click to see our video about metallic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ And here's our video comparing ionic and covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Essential Chemistry Lessons help all year long: What is a Mole? Avogadro's Number: http://bit.ly/2laJh0S Molar Mass: http://bit.ly/2pNfg8L Scientific Notation: http://bit.ly/2cv6yTw Significant Figures: http://bit.ly/2b1g3aJ Unit Conversion 1: http://bit.ly/1YGOQgw Unit Conversion 2: http://bit.ly/1RGbwZ1 Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/2gmSWfe ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios.
Views: 183883 Socratica
Chemical Bonding|Sigma and Pi bonds| Why is sigma bond stronger than Pi bond|CBSE  11 Chemistry
 
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What is COVALENT BOND? What does COVALENT BOND mean? COVALENT BOND meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is COVALENT BOND? What does COVALENT BOND mean? COVALENT BOND meaning - COVALENT BOND definition - COVALENT BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A covalent bond, also called a molecular bond, is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms. These electron pairs are known as shared pairs or bonding pairs, and the stable balance of attractive and repulsive forces between atoms, when they share electrons, is known as covalent bonding. For many molecules, the sharing of electrons allows each atom to attain the equivalent of a full outer shell, corresponding to a stable electronic configuration. Covalent bonding includes many kinds of interactions, including ?-bonding, ?-bonding, metal-to-metal bonding, agostic interactions, bent bonds, and three-center two-electron bonds. The term covalent bond dates from 1939. The prefix co- means jointly, associated in action, partnered to a lesser degree, etc.; thus a "co-valent bond", in essence, means that the atoms share "valence", such as is discussed in valence bond theory. In the molecule H 2, the hydrogen atoms share the two electrons via covalent bonding. Covalency is greatest between atoms of similar electronegativities. Thus, covalent bonding does not necessarily require that the two atoms be of the same elements, only that they be of comparable electronegativity. Covalent bonding that entails sharing of electrons over more than two atoms is said to be delocalized. Atomic orbitals (except for s orbitals) have specific directional properties leading to different types of covalent bonds. Sigma bonds (? bonds) are the strongest covalent bonds and are due to head-on overlapping of orbitals on two different atoms. A single bond is usually a sigma bond. Pi bonds are weaker and are due to lateral overlap between p (or d) orbitals. A double bond between two given atoms consists of one sigma and one pi bond, and a triple bond is one sigma and two pi bonds. Covalent bonds are also affected by the electronegativity of the connected atoms which determines the chemical polarity of the bond. Two atoms with equal electronegativity will make nonpolar covalent bonds such as H–H. An unequal relationship creates a polar covalent bond such as with H-Cl.
Views: 5719 The Audiopedia
CH110 4.6 Partial Ionic Character of Covalent Bonds
 
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A discussion of how polar covalent bonds have partial ionic character. This is from Section 4.6 in Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach by Zumdahl & Zumdahl.
Views: 2780 Ratliff Chemistry
The Strongest Bond- Ionic Bonding
 
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By Manasi Gummaraju, Jenny Wey, and Mohana Krishnan Mrs. Day 3rd Period
Views: 71 Manasi
What Are Intermolecular Forces | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn what intermolecular forces are, the three most common types and the differences between them. An intermolecular force is simply an attractive force between neighbouring molecules. There are three common types of intermolecular force: permanent dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' forces. All these three forces are very much weaker than ionic or covalent bonds which bind atoms and ions together in elements and compounds. Permanent dipole-dipole forces: A polar molecule is one in which there is a permanent dipole, arising usually because the different atoms in the molecule have different electro-negativities. Hydrogen chloride is a polar molecule as the pair of electrons in the H---Cl bond are nearer the Cl atom because it has a greater electronegativity than the H atom. The two electrons of the covalent bond between the hydrogen and chlorine atoms are nearer the chlorine atom because of its greater electronegativity. Thus there will be an attraction between the chlorine atom of one molecule and the hydrogen atom of a neighbouring molecule. Hydrogen bonds: The second type of intermolecular force is the hydrogen bond. The permanent dipole in a covalent bond between a hydrogen atom and a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom is particularly strong. Thus the attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is much stronger than the permanent dipole-dipole attraction between the two hydrogen chloride molecules. This particular type of dipole-dipole attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is given the special name of hydrogen bond. Even though a hydrogen bond has only about 5% the strength of a covalent bond, it does have significant effects on the physical properties of compounds. Were it not for hydrogen bonds both water and alcohol would be gases at room temperature and pressure. Hydrogen bonds explain the lower volatility of alcohols compared to that of alkanes of similar molecular mass. van der Waals’ forces: van der Waals’ forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions. They arise out of movement of the electrons in the shells.These induced dipole-dipole interactions, called van der Waals’ forces occur in all molecules, whether polar or not, but are the only intermolecular forces between non-polar molecules such as the halogens and the noble gases. As the number of electrons in the molecule increases, so do the van der Waals’ forces. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Breaking Covalent Bonds
 
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First I am going to explain what covalent bonds are, and then we will be breaking covalent bonds in a fun experiment. Fun hands-on science workshop: http://bit.ly/2ha6SeT
Views: 8983 Susan Evans
Ionic and covalent bonding animation
 
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Ionic bonding formed when one atom has sufficient strength of attraction to remove ion from the other atom. Covalent bonding occurs when neither atom has sufficient strength to remove the other atom's electron. They would instead share electrons to form stable configurations of electrons.
Views: 1244118 kosasihiskandarsjah
The strongest bond
 
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In episode 5, Jordan and Charlie delve into life’s strongest bond, listen to a volcano’s eruption sequence and explore the new online hub for neuroscientists. And there’s a new app for that – Science360 radio that is.
AMIE Exam Lectures- Materials Science & Engineering | Primary Bonds | 2.4
 
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Materials Science & Engineering Primary Bond Timeline --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -Primary Bond The Bonds Between atoms can be -Primary Bond -Secondary Bond -Primary bond Properties -Stronger Bonds than Secondary Bond -Primary Bonds or Chemical Bonds Involve Valance Electron. -Ionic Bonds -Covalent Bonds -Metallic Bonds -Bond and Property relation ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Video By EdupediaWorld Click Here For Playlist https://www..com/playlist?list=PLJumA3phskPFPkGEkQe6YWZs8Z1-9xkkg All Right Reserved.
Views: 15376 Edupedia World
Chemistry: What is an Ionic Bond?
 
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Chemistry: What is an Ionic Bond? Ionic bonds are one of the 3 main types of intramolecular forces, along with covalent bonds and metallic bonds. Ionic bonds are very strong, due to powerful electrostatic attraction between opposite ions (a metallic cation and a nonmetallic anion). Many ionic compounds dissolve easily in water, however. We show two examples of the formation of an ionic bond using Lewis dot structure notation. You can click on the links below to jump to sections in the lesson: 0:28 Definition of an Ionic Bond 1:21 Example 1: Write Lewis Dot Structure of NaCl bond formation 2:31 Example 2: Write Lewis Dot Structure of the reaction between potassium and oxygen 3:25 Why Ionic Compounds Conduct Electricity (electrolytes) 4:03 Solubility of Ionic Compounds Click to watch our video about covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1HYZmow Click to see our video about metallic bonds: http://bit.ly/1UoASiZ And here's our video comparing ionic and covalent bonds: http://bit.ly/1Nz4Kpy Intermolecular Forces: http://bit.ly/2xAnoMt ///////////////////////// Essential Chemistry Lessons help all year long: What is a Mole? Avogadro's Number: http://bit.ly/2laJh0S Molar Mass: http://bit.ly/2pNfg8L Scientific Notation: http://bit.ly/2cv6yTw Significant Figures: http://bit.ly/2b1g3aJ Unit Conversion 1: http://bit.ly/1YGOQgw Unit Conversion 2: http://bit.ly/1RGbwZ1 Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/2gmSWfe ///////////////////////// Our Periodic Table app is FREE in the Google Play store! http://goo.gl/yg9mAF Don't miss our other chemistry videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQw9G... Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! ///////////////////////// To support more videos from Socratica, visit Socratica Patreon https://www.patreon.com/socratica http://bit.ly/29gJAyg Socratica Paypal https://www.paypal.me/socratica We also accept Bitcoin! :) Our address is: 1EttYyGwJmpy9bLY2UcmEqMJuBfaZ1HdG9 ///////////////////////// We recommend the following books: Brown and LeMay Chemistry: The Central Science 13th edition: http://amzn.to/2n5SXtB 14th edition: http://amzn.to/2mHk79f McGraw/Hill Chemistry by Chang & Goldsby http://amzn.to/2mO2khf Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks http://amzn.to/2nlaJp0 Napoleon's Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History http://amzn.to/2lJZzO3 ///////////////////////// Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time. Kimberly taught AP Biology and Chemistry at an exclusive prep school for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. Creative Commons picture credits: sodium chloride 3D lattice http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NaCl.png Author: Raj6
Views: 43517 Socratica
Which Bond Is Stronger Single Or Double?
 
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Which bond is stronger single or double? Watch more videos for more knowledge Single bonds, double bonds, and triple bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/k7Cc5wp7Rqw SINGLE, DOUBLE, & TRIPLE COVALENT BONDS ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/6Cv3D0Zi56w Are Single Or Double Bonds Stronger? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/zEQyuQR5qCI Bond order, Bond Length and Bond Strength ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/d3io8p0koOc Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/5AOblYlknBc Single, Double and Triple Bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/oshS0T4ehUo Double bond - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/EAYpK1CG-yg Comparing bond lengths for single, double, and ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/OX3FK89jrhw The strength of carbon–carbon bond - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/PYvGnypbf80 Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/rOC9-3aqqys Bond Order, Bond Lengths, and Bond Strengths ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/fvk8yN4TzGc Hydrogen Bonding and Common Mistakes - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/PyC5r2mB4d4 Sigma and Pi bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/_qzdRPv4Ns4 Bond Length and Bond Energy - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/I9jd1Ew_YGU Double and Triple Bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/F_1arhpDb8U Covalent Bonding of Hydrogen, Oxygen ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/0HfN3CvXP2M Bond length and Bond strength - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/WzYIZ64YPPo Sigma and Pi Bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/hY6HWbxTkW0 sigma and pi bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/ree49ge4VA4 Sigma Bond | Chemistry | Chegg Tutors - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/Fjuaw_GGL9U
Views: 72 Vincent Vincent
why sigma bond is stronger than pi bond??|Chemistry Ring
 
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Hello we are here with a new video that will help you understand chemistry in an easy way ************About this Video************ this vedio will explain that why is sigma bond stronger than pi bond Let us know in comments and please like share and subscribe Thanks #chemistryRing #youtube #sigmabond why sigma bond is stronger than pi bond
Views: 243 Chemistry Ring
Are Single Or Double Bonds Stronger?
 
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"Are Single Or Double Bonds Stronger? Watch more videos for more knowledge Are Single Or Double Bonds Stronger? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/zEQyuQR5qCI Which Bond Is Stronger Single Or Double? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/3J8ElsPhzZw Single bonds, double bonds, and triple bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/k7Cc5wp7Rqw Comparing bond lengths for single, double, and ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/OX3FK89jrhw Bond order, Bond Length and Bond Strength ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/d3io8p0koOc Bond Length and Bond Energy - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/I9jd1Ew_YGU Chemistry: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds (Which ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/5AOblYlknBc SINGLE, DOUBLE, & TRIPLE COVALENT BONDS ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/6Cv3D0Zi56w Sigma and Pi bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/_qzdRPv4Ns4 Covalent Bonding in Carbon Dioxide | Chemistry ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/rOC9-3aqqys Hydrogen Bonding and Common Mistakes - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/PyC5r2mB4d4 sigma and pi bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/ree49ge4VA4 Single, Double and Triple Bonds - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/oshS0T4ehUo "
Views: 9 Tip Tip 3
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IONIC BOND AND COVALENT BOND CLASS 9 & CLASS 11 CHEMISTRY- CHEMICAL BONDING
 
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LIKE, SHARE, COMMENT & SUBSCRIBE "DIGITAL KEMISTRY" CLICK CHANNEL LINK: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx3U_VSvrZALGioz9m1qMZw?view_as=subscriber EMAIL: [email protected] For more Chemistry videos #digitalkemistry - Urdu, Hindi, English THIS VIDEO WILL CLEAR YOUR CONCEPT OF IONIC AND COVALENT BOND, DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IONIC & COVALENT BOND WITH ANIMATION. ALSO, HELP IN UNDERSTANDING THE PROPERTIES OF IONIC AND COVALENT BONDl FOR CLASS 9 AND CLASS 11 CHEMISTRY CHAPTER CHEMICAL BONDING. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Hybridization of atomic orbitals, Sigma and Pi bonds| sp, sp2, sp3 Hybridization | chemistry" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jeawkKQP4c -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 175 Digital Kemistry
Chemistry Essentials: What is a covalent bond?
 
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A quick definition of a covalent bond. Chem Fairy: Louise McCartney Director: Michael Harrison Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison
Views: 4070 Socratica
Ionic and Covalent Bonding
 
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This video explains all about Ionic and Covalent bonding :) enjoy!
Views: 5680 DoodleScience
Ionic and Covalent Bonds
 
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View in 720p for best quality!
Views: 22187 Ben's Chem Videos
Types Of Chemical Bonds - What Are Chemical Bonds - Covalent Bonds And Ionic Bonds - What Are Ions
 
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In this video we discuss how chemical bonds are formed, we cover ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Chemical bonding is important in many different functions of the body. Transcript and notes The interactions of 2 or more atoms mainly occur at the outermost shell, or energy level. The result of these interactions results in a chemical reaction. In atoms that have fewer or more than 8 electrons in their outermost energy level, reactions occur that result in the loss, gain, or sharing of electrons with another atom to satisfy the octet rule. The octet rule means that elements tend to combine so that each atom has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. This results in the formation of structures such as crystals or molecules. Two atoms of oxygen can combine with one atom of carbon to form carbon dioxide or CO2. There are two main types of chemical bonds, ionic bonds and covalent bonds. Ionic bonds are bonds where the transfer of electrons takes place. Let’s see how this type of bond works. So, here we have a sodium atom, which has an atomic number of 11, meaning it has 11 protons in its nucleus and 11 electrons in its shells or energy levels. Shell one has 2 electrons, shell 2 has 8 electrons and shell 3 has 1 electron. And here we have a chlorine atom, which has an atomic number of 17, so 17 protons and 17 electrons. It has 2 electrons in shell one, 8 in shell 2 and 7 in shell 3. We know that atoms want to have 8 electrons in their outer shell, so Sodium can give up one electron, and now it has 8 electrons in its outer shell, and chlorine can take that electron from sodium and that will give it 8 electrons in its outer shell. Since the sodium atom gave up an electron it now has 11 protons, which are positively charged, and 10 electrons which are negatively charged. This results in the formation of a sodium ion with a positive charge. An ion is an atom or molecule with a net electrical charge due to the loss or gain of an electron. Since the chlorine atom gained an electron, and now has 17 protons and 18 electrons, it is a chlorine ion with a negative charge. The positively charged sodium ion is now attracted to the negatively charged chlorine ion, and NaCl or table salt is formed. This is an ionic bond. So, ionic bonding is when an electron transfer takes place and generates 2 oppositely charged ions. Now for covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are chemical bonds that are formed by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons by the outer energy levels or shells of two atoms. The 4 major elements of the body, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen almost always form covalent bonds by sharing electrons. So, for instance, 2 hydrogen atoms can bond by sharing a pair of electrons. Hydrogen is one of the exceptions to the octet rule of having 8 electrons in the outer shell, because it only has one shell. Let’s look at carbon dioxide or co2 again, which form a covalent bond. Oxygen has an atomic mass of 8, so 8 protons, and 8 electrons, 2 in its inner shell and 6 in its outer shell, so, oxygen atoms want 2 more electrons for their outer shell. Carbon has an atomic mass of 6, 6 protons and 6 electrons, 2 in the inner shell and 4 in the outer shell, so it wants 4 more electrons for its outer shell. They can make each other happy by sharing what they have. Oxygen atom number 1 can share 2 of its electrons and the carbon atom can share 2 of its electrons with oxygen atom number one, making oxygen atom number one happy. And oxygen atom number 2 can come in and like oxygen atom number one it can share two of its electrons and the carbon atom has 2 more of its own electrons that it can share with oxygen atom number 2. So now all 3 atoms are happy. By sharing 2 pairs of electrons in this situation a double bond has been formed, and double bonds are important in chemical reactions.
Views: 5569 Whats Up Dude
Stronger Ionic bond 004
 
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Which ionic compound is predicted to have the greatest bond strength? LiF or Li2O ———————————— INTERVIEW 1) Revell, K. (November 16, 2016) “An Interview with Heath Giesbrecht, Part I” The Macmillan Community https://community.macmillan.com/groups/flipped-chemistry/blog/2016/11/17/an-interview-with-heath-giesbrecht-part-1 2) Revell, K. (November 16, 2016) “An Interview with Heath Giesbrecht, Part II” The Macmillan Community https://community.macmillan.com/groups/flipped-chemistry/blog/2016/11/17/an-interview-with-heath-giesbrecht-part-2 ———————————— INTERDISCIPLINARY ART LECTURE: 1) Giesbrecht, H., Peet, K. (January 20, 2016) “Translating Failure” WEDGE_SPACE https://vimeo.com/152432030 ———————————— FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/profheath/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/prof_heath
Introduction to Covalent Bonds | Can water disrupt covalent bonds? H2O covalent or ionic bond?
 
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A covalent bond forming H 2 (right) where two hydrogen atoms share the two electrons A covalent bond , also called a molecular bond , is a chemical bond that involves the sharing of electron pairs between atoms . These electron pairs are known as shared pairs or bonding pairs, and the stable balance of attractive and repulsive forces between atoms, when they share electrons , is known as covalent bonding. [ better source needed ] For many molecules , the sharing of electrons allows each atom to attain the equivalent of a full outer shell, corresponding to a stable electronic configuration. Covalent bonding includes many kinds of interactions, including σ-bonding , π-bonding , metal-to-metal bonding, agostic interactions , bent bonds , and three-center two-electron bonds .[2][3] The term covalent bond dates from 1939. The prefix co- means jointly, associated in action, partnered to a lesser degree, etc.; thus a "co-valent bond", in essence, means that the atoms share "valence", such as is discussed in valence bond theory. In the molecule H2 , the hydrogen atoms share the two electrons via covalent bonding. Covalency is greatest between atoms of similar electronegativities . Thus, covalent bonding does not necessarily require that the two atoms be of the same elements, only that they be of comparable electronegativity. Covalent bonding that entails sharing of electrons over more than two atoms is said to be delocalized . History Early concepts in covalent bonding arose from this kind of image of the molecule of methane. Covalent bonding is implied in the Lewis structure by indicating electrons shared between atoms. The term covalence in regard to bonding was first used in 1919 by Irving Langmuir in a Journal of the American Chemical Society article entitled "The Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms and Molecules". Langmuir wrote that "we shall denote by the term covalence the number of pairs of electrons that a given atom shares with its neighbors." The idea of covalent bonding can be traced several years before 1919 to Gilbert N. Lewis , who in 1916 described the sharing of electron pairs between atoms. He introduced the Lewis notation or electron dot notation or Lewis dot structure, in which valence electrons (those in the outer shell) are represented as dots around the atomic symbols. Pairs of electrons located between atoms represent covalent bonds. Multiple pairs represent multiple bonds, such as double bonds and triple bonds . An alternative form of representation, not shown here, has bond-forming electron pairs represented as solid lines. Lewis proposed that an atom forms enough covalent bonds to form a full (or closed) outer electron shell. In the diagram of methane shown here, the carbon atom has a valence of four and is, therefore, surrounded by eight electrons (the octet rule), four from the carbon itself and four from the hydrogens bonded to it. Each hydrogen has a valence of one and is surrounded by two electrons (a duet rule) – its own one electron plus one from the carbon. The numbers of electrons correspond to full shells in the quantum theory of the atom; the outer shell of a carbon atom is the n = 2 shell, which can hold eight electrons, whereas the outer (and only) shell of a hydrogen atom is the n = 1 shell, which can hold only two. While the idea of shared electron pairs provides an effective qualitative picture of covalent bonding, quantum mechanics is needed to understand the nature of these bonds and predict the structures and properties of simple molecules. Walter Heitler and Fritz London are credited with the first successful quantum mechanical explanation of a chemical bond (molecular hydrogen) in 1927. Their work was based on the valence bond model, which assumes that a chemical bond is formed when there is good overlap between the atomic orbitals of participating atoms. Types of covalent bonds Atomic orbitals (except for s orbitals) have specific directional properties leading to different types of covalent bonds. Sigma (σ) bonds are the strongest covalent bonds and are due to head-on overlapping of orbitals on two different atoms. A single bond is usually a σ bond. Pi (π) bonds are weaker and are due to lateral overlap between p (or d) orbitals. A double bond between two given atoms consists of one σ and one π bond, and a triple bond is one σ and two π bonds. Covalent bonds are also affected by the electronegativity of the connected atoms which determines the chemical polarity of the bond. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://www.britannica
Views: 2 DiscoverPhysics
ionic and covalent compounds
 
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Understand the difference between ionic and covalent bonding and the properties of the compounds they create
Views: 1797 adventures in ISTEM
Strength of Covalent Bonds
 
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Views: 1324 chrobotham
Covalent Bonding in Water, Methane, Ammonia & Hydrogen Fluoride | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we will look at covalent bonds in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride. They are small, covalently-bonded molecules. The atoms within them share electrons because they have half full or more than half full valence shells of electrons: they are non-metals. Methane is a fuel, ammonia is used in household cleaners, water is a drink and the essence of life, and hydrogen fluoride is used to etch glass. The bonding in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride shows a pattern: methane is carbon bonded to four hydrogen atoms; ammonia is nitrogen bonded to three hydrogen atoms; water is oxygen bonded to two hydrogen atoms, and hydrogen fluoride is fluorine bonded to just one hydrogen atom. Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine appear in the periodic table in this order, moving along the second row from left to right. Carbon has four out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so makes four covalent bonds. Nitrogen has five out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so can make three covalent bonds to make the shell full. Oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell. It can bond with two hydrogen atoms to share 2 more electrons. It now has a full outer shell of 8 electrons. Ammonia has two electrons, called a lone pair of electrons, occupying the fourth position. These electrons take up space. Because electrons are negatively charged, lone pairs repel bonds even more strongly than bonds repel each other. This makes ammonia less symmetric than methane. The water molecule is bent in shape. Oxygen has two lone pairs. Negatively charged lone pairs are slightly attracted to the hydrogen atoms, so there is a weak attraction between molecules. Forces between molecules are a little stronger in water than in ammonia or methane. Water is liquid at room temperature and pressure, whilst ammonia a gas that is easily liquefied, and methane is a gas. Intermolecular forces are normally very weak in covalent compounds, but in water they are just strong enough to keep it liquid. A bit more energy is needed to overcome these forces and boil it. If water were not a liquid, life as we know it would be completely different! Ethanol contains carbon and oxygen bonding. The carbon atoms always form four bonds and the oxygen forms two. Remember, carbon forms 4 bonds, nitrogen forms 3 bonds and has one lone pair of electrons, and oxygen forms two bonds and looks bent. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
sigma and pi bonds
 
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Chemistry help! My response to, "What's a sigma and a pi bond? How can I identify them in a chemical structure?"
Views: 289060 Janet Coonce
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 734158 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Bonding  Ionic vs  Covalent bonds
 
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BIO 106 Bonique Morton, M.D. , M.P.H. 1/20/15
Views: 1015 EasternGatewayCCTS
Ionic and Covalent  Bonding Song
 
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There are a plenty of ionic and covalent bonds of different strength. General chemistry books refer to simple inorganic compounds, eg NaCl, organic and biochemistry textbooks take into account mainly organic compounds in which C-C bond is rather strong. But a simple test - heating eg NaCl and organic compound without oxygen in atmosphere to, say 800 C, shows organic compound will decompose.
Views: 550 MsEsaii
Chem Done Easy - Chemical Bonding (Ionic Vs Covalent)
 
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A quick and easy explanation on how different atoms bind together to form compounds by comparing ionic vs covalent bonding. Enjoy! :)
Views: 4966 Brock Grant