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Human Capital by Gary S. Becker
 
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Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition) Gary S. Becker. Published in January 1994 by The University of Chicago Press. © 1994 by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
Views: 10 BookLover
10of19 - Investment in Schooling and Training - Higher education and College
 
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GARY BECKER This the tenth lecture in the "Lectures on Human Capital" series by Gary Becker. This series of lectures recorded during the Spring of 2010 are from ECON 343 - Human Capital, a class taught every year by Gary Becker at the University of Chicago. In this class, Becker expounds upon the theory of Human Capital that he helped create and for which he won the Nobel Prize. Please see attached lecture notes, video annotations, and reading list for more information. --- Professor Becker continues to elaborate on the decision to attend college. He also discusses hypotheses for why the cost of tuition has risen. Becker then discusses the consequences of this rise in tuition and how it affects the cost functions of different industries. He explains why many people misunderstand the causation of the rise in tuition and illustrates what he believes are the correct forces. He discusses how the recursive property of human capital is present in this context. Also, he explains why students have a better deal in these days than they had in the past. He questions if college subsidization causes a progressive taxing structure. He claims that the benefits of going to college are mostly private ones and illustrates why there are not large externalities associated with college education. He gives a theoretical and an empirical discussion about the college/high school wage gap in the U.S. He offers facts of other developed and developing countries as well. He also dicusses the extremely negative consequences of dropping out of high school: "high school drop outs are socially condemned in almost every dimension". Finally, he explains why people drop out. Key concepts: benefits of going to college, high school drop out, externalities from education, sheepskin effect, subsidies to education, rising cost of college tuition. Main discussions: • Lecture 10, (13:15-09:40): Professor Becker discusses the misunderstandings about the causes of the rise in tuition and gives some insights about the recursive property of human capital in this context. Also, he discusses issues about subsidies and externalities in the context of investment in education. • Lecture 10, (17:40-24:00): Professor Becker recommends some public policies in order to get more people to finish high school in an efficient way. • Lecture 10, (26:15-27:45): Professor Becker explains why GED programs do not work. Main quotes: • "You have an increase not only in the earnings of college graduates relative to high school graduates but you have an increase in the net benefits... the rate of return ... of the college education, despite the increase in tuition. So, I don't feel sorry for the students who have to pay this higher tuition". References: • Chapter V: Rates of Return form College Education in Becker, Gary. 1974. Human Capital. Third ed. pp. 161-204. • Salvador Navarro Lozano. Notes on Gary Becker's Human Capital and the Economy. pp. 18-21. -- Lecture Notes: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Lecture_Notes-Human_Capital.pdf Reading List: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Sp2007readinglist.pdf Video Annotations: https://mindonline.uchicago.edu/media/ssd/econ/becker/Annotations_to-videos-Human_Capital.pdf ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
The Power of Ideas: Milton Friedman and Chicago Economics
 
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Milton Friedman was one of the greatest economists of the 20th century. His continuing influence results from the power of his ideas—ideas built on the twin pillars of sound economic theory and careful empirical analysis. We invite you to join University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer, professors Gary Becker and Lars Hansen, and Research Scholar Scott Kominers in a discussion of the lasting impact of Milton Friedman and the University of Chicago's Becker Friedman Institute. The Chicago School of Economics. Learn more about the Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics at https://https;//bfi.uchicago.edu ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGOytSubscribe About #UChicago: A destination for inquiry, research, and education, the University of Chicago empowers scholars to challenge conventional thinking. Our diverse community of creative thinkers celebrates ideas, and is celebrated for them. #UChicago on the Web: Home: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-home News: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-news Facebook: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-FB Twitter: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-TW Instagram: http://bit.ly/UCHICAGO-IG University of Chicago on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/uchicago *** ACCESSIBILITY: If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please email [email protected]
What is RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY? What does RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ Check our NEW launched Top 10 lists website - https://topratedten.com/ ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ LIKE us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/theaudiopediacom ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY? What does RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY mean? RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY meaning - RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY definition - RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Rational choice theory, also known as choice theory or rational action theory, is a framework for understanding and often formally modeling social and economic behavior. The basic premise of rational choice theory is that aggregate social behavior results from the behavior of individual actors, each of whom is making their individual decisions. The theory also focuses on the determinants of the individual choices (methodological individualism). Rational choice theory then assumes that an individual has preferences among the available choice alternatives that allow them to state which option they prefer. These preferences are assumed to be complete (the person can always say which of two alternatives they consider preferable or that neither is preferred to the other) and transitive (if option A is preferred over option B and option B is preferred over option C, then A is preferred over C). The rational agent is assumed to take account of available information, probabilities of events, and potential costs and benefits in determining preferences, and to act consistently in choosing the self-determined best choice of action. Rationality is widely used as an assumption of the behavior of individuals in microeconomic models and analyses and appears in almost all economics textbook treatments of human decision-making. It is also used in political science, sociology, and philosophy. A particular version of rationality is instrumental rationality, which involves seeking the most cost-effective means to achieve a specific goal without reflecting on the worthiness of that goal. Gary Becker was an early proponent of applying rational actor models more widely. Becker won the 1992 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his studies of discrimination, crime, and human capital. The concept of rationality used in rational choice theory is different from the colloquial and most philosophical use of the word. Colloquially, "rational" behaviour typically means "sensible", "predictable", or "in a thoughtful, clear-headed manner." Rational choice theory uses a narrower definition of rationality. At its most basic level, behavior is rational if it is goal-oriented, reflective (evaluative), and consistent (across time and different choice situations). This contrasts with behavior that is random, impulsive, conditioned, or adopted by (unevaluative) imitation. Early neoclassical economists writing about rational choice, including William Stanley Jevons, assumed that agents make consumption choices so as to maximize their happiness, or utility. Contemporary theory bases rational choice on a set of choice axioms that need to be satisfied, and typically does not specify where the goal (preferences, desires) comes from. It mandates just a consistent ranking of the alternatives.:501 Individuals choose the best action according to their personal preferences and the constraints facing them. E.g., there is nothing irrational in preferring fish to meat the first time, but there is something irrational in preferring fish to meat in one instant and preferring meat to fish in another, without anything else having changed. Rational choice theorists do not claim that the theory describes the choice process, but rather that it predicts the outcome and pattern of choices. An assumption often added to the rational choice paradigm is that individual preferences are self-interested, in which case the individual can be referred to as a homo economicus. Such an individual acts as if balancing costs against benefits to arrive at action that maximizes personal advantage. Proponents of such models, particularly those associated with the Chicago school of economics, do not claim that a model's assumptions are an accurate description of reality, only that they help formulate clear and falsifiable hypotheses. In this view, the only way to judge the success of a hypothesis is empirical tests. To use an example from Milton Friedman, if a theory that says that the behavior of the leaves of a tree is explained by their rationality passes the empirical test, it is seen as successful.
Views: 32659 The Audiopedia
Tribute to Gary Becker
 
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Presenters: Guity Nashat Becker, Kevin Murphy, Richard Posner, Stephen Stigler. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
The Power of Ideas: Milton Friedman and Chicago Economics
 
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Milton Friedman was one of the greatest economists of the 20th century. His continuing influence results from the power of his ideas—ideas built on the twin pillars of sound economic theory and careful empirical analysis. We invite you to join University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer, professors Gary Becker and Lars Hansen, and Research Scholar Scott Kominers in a discussion of the lasting impact of Milton Friedman and the University of Chicago's Becker Friedman Institute. Learn more about at http://bfi.uchicago.edu. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
What is RATIONAL ADDICTION? What does RATIONAL ADDICTION mean? RATIONAL ADDICTION meaning
 
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What is RATIONAL ADDICTION? What does RATIONAL ADDICTION mean? RATIONAL ADDICTION meaning &- RATIONAL ADDICTION definition - RATIONAL ADDICTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Rational addiction is the hypothesis that addictions can be usefully modeled as specific kinds of rational, forward-looking, optimal consumption plans. The canonical theory comes from work done by Kevin M. Murphy and Gary S. Becker. A theory of addictions in the broad sense—for example, to heroin, tobacco, religion, or food—the article tried to reconcile addictions with the standard rational choice framework of modern economics. Though controversial, this theoretical approach has become "one of the standard models in the literature on addictive behavior" in economics, and a variety of extensions and modifications have been developed and published by other authors over the years. A survey of researchers who had authored or co-authored peer-reviewed articles on rational addiction theory indicates that the researchers see the theories as successful in a number of ways: 73% of the respondents see them as extending and enriching consumer theory, 56% see them as containing relevant insights on the welfare effects of addictive goods and public policies towards these, 44% see them as providing useful tools for predicting aggregate consumption behavior, 39% see them as providing insights into how addicts choose that are relevant for treatment professionals, and 27% see them as providing evidence that addictions are actually a sequence of rational, welfare maximizing choices. Criticism of rational addiction theories have emerged along different lines. One strand of criticism is the already mentioned econometric work. A prominent critic working along different lines is the philosopher Jon Elster who in a series of works has claimed that theories in Becker's framework are conceptually incoherent in their view of preferences, as well as inconsistent with the ambivalence and desire for increased self-regulation that is empirically displayed by many addicts. Economist Ole Rogeberg has used the theories as a case example of what he calls "absurd theories" in economics, and argues that the theories "illustrate how absurd choice theories in economics get taken seriously as possibly true explanations and tools for welfare analysis despite being poorly interpreted, empirically unfalsifiable, and based on wildly inaccurate assumptions selectively justified by ad hoc stories." Research attempting to apply the rational addiction model to surveys of drug users have found the model inadequate to explain drug-taking behavior.
Views: 406 The Audiopedia
What is POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL? What does POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL mean?
 
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What is POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL? What does POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL mean? POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL meaning - POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL definition - POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Positive psychological capital is defined as the positive and developmental state of an individual as characterized by high self-efficacy, optimism, hope and resiliency. For decades psychology has been associated as dealing mainly with the treatment of mental illness, although other areas of research and application have existed since its origins. At the very end of the twentieth century a new approach in psychology gained popularity: positive psychology. Positive psychology, the study of optimal human functioning, is an attempt to respond to the systematic bias inherent in psychology's historical emphasis on mental illness rather than on mental wellness (Seligman, 2002), mainly by focusing on two, forgotten but classical psychological goals: Help ordinary people to live a more productive and meaningful life. A full realization of the potential that exists in the human being. Since Martin Seligman, a former head of American Psychological Association, chose positive psychology as the theme of his presidency term, more empirical research and theoretic development emerged in this field. Two new branches of positive psychology are being implemented into the industrial-organizational world. Positive organizational scholarship- originated by Kim Cameron and colleagues is a research field that emphasizes the positive characteristics of the organization that facilitates its ability to function during periods of crisis. Positive organizational behavior (POB) – originated by Fred Luthans a former president of the Academy of Management focuses on measurable positive- psychological states that are open to development and have impact on desired employee attitudes, behaviors, and performance. Drawing from positive psychology constructs and empirical research, four psychological resources were determined to best meet the POB scientific criteria: Hope, Efficacy, Resilience, and Optimism and were termed by Luthans and colleagues as psychological Capital or PsyCap and as en Emotional Capital (Gendron B., 2002, 2004). Emotional capital (EK), a capital in an economic sense: filling the gap of the Becker's Human capital measurement approach. It brings outcomes and makes a bridge between outcomes from psychology and economics by taking into account soft skills as the socio-emotional competencies described in emotional intelligence models from Goleman, Cherniss, Bar-on, Salovey & Meyer, Caruso, Sarni. Positive psychological capital: an heritage versus capital. In combination, the four constructs making up PsyCap were empirically determined to be a second-order, core construct that had a stronger relationship with satisfaction and performance than each of the components by itself. The four components are defined as follows: Hope – Is defined as a positive motivational state where two basic elements - successful feeling of agency (or goal oriented determination) and pathways (or proactively planning to achieve those goals) interact. Self efficacy – Is defined as people's confidence in their ability to achieve a specific goal in a specific situation. Optimism – was defined by Seligman by Attribution theory (Fritz Heider, 1958). An Optimistic person is defined as one that makes "Internal" or "dispositional", fixed and global attributions for positive events and "External" or "situational", not fixed and specific attributions to negative events. Optimism in Psycap is thought as a realistic construct that regards what an employee can or cannot do, as such, optimism reinforces efficacy and hope. ....
Views: 887 The Audiopedia
"Social Preferences and Parental Influence in Preschooler" - Avner Ben-Ner
 
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"Social Preferences and Parental Influence in Preschooler" - Avner Ben-Ner, University of Minnesota Abstract: Do young children emulate their parents and other adults in giving? We conducted an experiment in which children participate in a dictator game with six stickers, which they play before and after they observe adults play a dictator game with a six dollars endowment. We separate children's giving after they observe others' giving into general family influence and specific emulation, and examine the emulation relationship relative to various demographic and attributes of children and parents. Biography: Avner Ben-Ner is Professor in the Center for Human Resources and Labor Studies (formerly the Industrial Relations Center) in the Carlson School of Management and Affiliated Professor in the Law School at the University of Minnesota. His current research has two broad strands. First, it concerns the determinants of organization design (decision-making, incentives, monitoring, hiring) and ownership (for-profit, nonprofit, government, cooperative) and their effects on performance and the well-being of various stakeholders. Second, it examines the relationship between social preferences (the inclination to trust, be trustworthy, to cooperate) and organizational, economic and social behavior. He is attempting to unite, or at least combine, these two strands, examining the dynamic relationship between preferences and organization design. Related research regards various dimensions of identity and group diversity and their impact on performance in the laboratory, the classroom and the soccer field. He also studies the relationship between physical activity, health and work performance. A future project, driven by his empirical findings on the importance of complexity for demand for different types of skills and for organization design, will focus on the sources and consequences of complexity in economic and social life. Slides: http://spihub.org/site/resource_files/conf2013/slides/Ben-Ner.pdf Event & Venue: 2013 SPI Annual Conference, University of Chicago. Session: Development of Generosity Date: Oct 18th - 19th 2013 More Info: http://SPIhub.org/2013-conf-videos Visit us at http://SPIhub.org
Views: 267 SPI hub
Ethnography and Theory with Didier Fassin - Conversations with History
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Didier Fassin, James D. Wolfensohn Professor, School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, for a discussion of the interplay between ethnography and theory in understanding public institutions such as policing and prisons and international engagement such as humanitarianism. Fassin explains how immersion in these public institutions and endeavors when combined with sociological theory and history, highlights the disjunction between reality and avowed purpose and intention of participants. Emphasizing the importance of social inequality, the impact of history, and the displacement of goals, Fassin explores: What is police conduct like in a banlieue of Paris? What is the relationship between the judicial system and the penal system? What is the impact of an emphasis on compassion and suffering in humanitarian reasoning and governance? Series: "Conversations with History" [5/2016] [Humanities] [Show ID: 30563]
Panel on the Role of Economic Theory
 
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Will economic theory give way to pure data? Will mathematical models clarify the wisdom data promises? Will the next great economic theory be simple and intuitive, engineered and tethered to empirical data, computationally detailed, or some combination of each? Considering the impact of robust statistics, vast datasets and increasing computational power on the role of economic theory, a panel of varying perspectives consider the future of the field. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Gary Becker Intellectual Portrait part 4
 
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Gary Becker Interviewed by Judge Richard Posner
Views: 1460 lfvideo50
Understanding Inequality and What to Do About It
 
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This event brought together a panel of three leading economists—Thomas Piketty, Kevin Murphy, and Steven Durlauf—to discuss the sources of the rise in inequality in advanced industrialized countries over the past 40 years, the problems it poses, and effective responses. Nobel laureate James Heckman moderated the panel and guided the discussion. This event was cosponsored by the Becker Friedman Institute, the Harris School of Public Policy, the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Global Working Group, and the Center for the Economics of Human Development. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Life Expectancy, Medical Testing, and Human Capital Investment
 
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When facing a grim diagnosis of a life-shortening incurable disease, ignorance may be bliss—or at least a desirable state—and knowledge will change your life choices, according to research by Emily Oster, a faculty member with the Institute's Chicago Price Theory Initiative. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Rational choice theory
 
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Rational choice theory, also known as choice theory or rational action theory, is a framework for understanding and often formally modeling social and economic behavior. Rationality, interpreted as "wanting more rather than less of a good", is widely used as an assumption of the behavior of individuals in microeconomic models and analysis and appears in almost all economics textbook treatments of human decision-making. It is also central to some of modern political science, sociology, and philosophy. It attaches "wanting more" to instrumental rationality, which involves seeking the most cost-effective means to achieve a specific goal without reflecting on the worthiness of that goal. Gary Becker was an early proponent of applying rational actor models more widely. He won the 1992 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his studies of discrimination, crime, and human capital. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 6839 Audiopedia
Facts About Taxes: Richard Blundell
 
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Ricardo Professor of Political Economy Richard Blundell presents his paper "Taxation of Earnings and the Impact on Labor Supply and Human Capital," a comprehensive microeconomic analysis of the effects of UK tax policy. The paper was presented at "The Facts About Taxes" conference held by the Becker Friedman Institute in September 2013. Learn more about the paper and conference here: http://bit.ly/1b3ORlT If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Grave Matters: The Role of Death in Life - Sheldon Solomon, PhD
 
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Sheldon Solomon, PhD Professor of psychology at Skidmore College and co-author of The Worm at the Core: On the Role of Death in Life Cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker won a Pulitzer Prize in 1974 for The Denial of Death, arguing that fear of death is “the mainspring of human activity,” but his ideas were generally dismissed as philosophical speculation. Sheldon Solomon and his colleagues Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski developed Terror Management Theory (TMT) to substantiate Becker’s claim that death awareness has a profound and pervasive effect on our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in almost every domain of life. Find out how intimations of mortality influence everything from the mundane to the momentous—what you ate for lunch, whom you voted for in the last election, how judges make legal decisions, your attitudes about shopping, your mental health and physical well being, whom you love, and whom you hate.
Views: 14175 BostonMOS
Pizza and Conversation with James Heckman
 
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James J. Heckman, the Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor in Economics, is known for both his theoretical work and empirical research. In this Friedman Forum, he discusses an economist's tools and approach, and shows how they can be applied to address serious policy issues. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
CEHD - A Dynamic Model of Health, Education, and Wealth with Credit Constraints by Rong Hai
 
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Speaker(s): Rong Hai As part of the launch of the Center for the Economics of Human Development, Rong Hai, a Postdoctoral Scholar at CEHD and UChicago's Becker Friedman Institute, delivered the talk, "A Dynamic Model of Health, Education, and Wealth with Credit Constraints and Rational Addiction." The positive correlation between health, education, and wealth is well documented in economic literature. However, it is difficult to estimate the causal effect of these three factors because of the existence of reverse causality over time and selection based on individual heterogeneity. What are the economic mechanisms through which health, education, and wealth impact each other over the life cycle? How much of the observed positive correlation among these three factors is due to selection? To address these questions, this paper develops and structurally estimates a dynamic life-cycle model of health, education, and wealth that explicitly allows for credit constraints and rational addictive unhealthy behavior. The model analyzes the role health plays in an agent's life according to four channels: 1) as a form of human capital, as it affects labor market skills and thus wages; 2) as a factor influencing the utility we receive from various other choices, such as schooling and working; 3) as an input for health, as health is self-productive; and 4) as a consumption good, as we are able to derive enjoyment from our own physical well-being. The mission of the Center is to advance knowledge that fosters human flourishing by identifying sources of disadvantage and promoting equality of opportunity. The Center will produce empirical and theoretical research that integrates ideas and methods across the social and natural sciences to create rigorous evidence for public policy. You can keep up-to-date with ongoing research on our website at http://www.cehd.uchicago.edu.
Views: 529 hceconomics
Amartya Sen, "Creating Capabilities: Sources and Consequences for Law and Social Policy"
 
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This conference, organized by James Heckman, Martha Nussbaum and Robert Pollak, examines a variety of conceptions of human capability, including the Human Development and Capabilities Approach in relation to the recent literature on the economics, neuroscience, and psychology of human development in order to enrich both fields. The conference will foster a broader notion of capability formation than just formal education or cognition. It will adopt a life cycle perspective on capability expression and formation. Recent research documenting the contributions of families, schools, governments, and other institutions of society (including religious bodies, community groups, foster care, the juvenile justice system, and on-the-job training) to the formation of capabilities in children, adolescents, and young adults suggests that a broader framework for the Human Development Approach would be useful. The aim of the conference is to integrate recent advances in understanding how capabilities are produced into the Human Development Approach and to study the implications of the revised research program for law and public policy. Amartya Sen, the 1998 winner of The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, provided the keynote address on April 23, 2010.
Terror Management Theory (Sheldon Solomon - Ernest Becker)
 
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As graduate students at the University of Kansas in the late 1970s Jeff Greenberg, Tom Pyszczynski, and I were interested in understanding the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and ethnic conflict as well as the nature and function of self-esteem. In 1980, I accidentally stumbled across the work of the late cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker, who in books such as The Birth and Death of Meaning (1962), The Denial of Death (1973), and Escape From Evil (1975) argued that the uniquely human awareness of death, and the denial thereof, guides and directs a substantial proportion of human behavior. According to Becker, culture consists of humanly created (albeit quite unconsciously) beliefs about the nature of reality shared by individuals in groups to reduce or eliminate the potentially overwhelming terror engendered by the awareness of death by providing a sense of meaning and value that in turn confers the possibility of literal and/or symbolic immortality. Terror management theory resulted from our efforts to translate Beckers ideas into a formal theory that could be subjected to empirical scrutiny. According to terror management theory, people "manage" the potential terror associated with death through a dual-component anxiety-buffer consisting of a cultural worldview (beliefs about the nature of reality that provide a sense that the universe is meaningful, orderly, and stable and that provisions for immortality) and self-esteem (the perception that one is living up to the standards of value associated with the social role inhabited by individuals in the context of their culture, and hence rendering them eligible for safety and security in this life and immortality thereafter). Thus, while cultures vary considerably, they share the same defensive psychological function in common: to provide meaning and value and in so doing bestow psychological equanimity in the face of death. All cultural worldviews are ultimately shared fictions, in the sense that none of them are likely to be literally true, and their existence is generally sustained by social consensus. When everyone around us believes the same thing, we can be quite confident of the veracity of our beliefs. But, and here's the rub, when we do encounter people with different beliefs, this poses a challenge to our death-denying belief systems, which is why people are generally quite uncomfortable around, and hostile towards, those who are different. Additionally, because no symbolic cultural construction can actually overcome the physical reality of death, residual anxiety is unconsciously projected onto other groups of individuals as scapegoats, who are designated all-encompassing repositories of evil, the eradication of which would make earth as it is in heaven. We then typically respond to people with different beliefs or scapegoats by berating them, trying to convert them to our system of beliefs, and/or just killing them and in so doing assert that "my God is stronger than your God and we'll kick your ass to prove it." In order to test terror management theory, we designed what we call the mortality salience paradigm, which basically entails asking people to think about their own death (e.g., by asking them to respond to some questions about dying, or by subliminal exposure to death-related words, or being interviewed in front of a funeral parlor) and then asking them to make judgments about people or events that either bolster or threaten important aspects of the individuals cultural worldviews. We hypothesize that to the extent that culture serves a death-denying function, then making mortality salient should increase affection and altruistic behavior toward those who share or uphold cherished cultural beliefs, as well as increase hostility and disdain to those who disagree with cherished beliefs, or merely hold different ones. Sheldon Solomon on TMT
Views: 19641 pangeaprogressredux
Proof, Truth, Hands, and Mind with Ian Hacking
 
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Professor Ian Hacking explores how our innate sense of symmetry has enabled us to probe the hidden secrets of nature and also get along with each other. He presents a new development in his philosophy; one that remains in the spirit of what has established his reputation as a "Philosopher of the Particular Case." Hacking brought a new understanding of how statistics changed the world and how we think about it, from sociology to physics. His "Representing and Intervening" (1983) returned philosophers of science to their roots - experimental science. It began what he calls a "back to Francis Bacon movement." Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Council Lectures" [2/2011] [Humanities] [Show ID: 20382]
Asset Pricing and Sports Betting
 
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Tobias J. Moskowitz, the Fama Family Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, studies asset pricing, portfolio choice, risk sharing, market efficiency, real estate markets and finance, empirical corporate finance, and the business and analytics of sports. In this talk to MBA students, he examines the market for betting on major sporting events to see what lessons can be gleaned that might apply to the financial world. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Inquiry & Impact: Names, Faces, and Ideas: Discussion Section with Kevin Murphy and Benjamin Brooks
 
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Research Fellows at the Becker Friedman Institute are pre- and postdoctoral scholars who have already generated outstanding research in economics. These early career economists are offered a one- or two-year positions to leverage the rich collaborative environment and resources of the University of Chicago in order to pursue further original work. In this episode, Kevin Murphy talks with Ben Brooks about the experience of being at the University of Chicago as a BFI Research Fellow.
Jason Silva on Overcoming Anxiety and Finding Flow | Impact Theory
 
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Emmy-nominated host of Brain Games, the highest-rated show in National Geographic’s history, Jason Silva is a masterful content creator. Prepare to experience the ecstasy of flow as Jason unveils the paradigm-shifting philosophies that so beautifully encapsulate the agony and ecstasy of the human experience in this episode of Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu. SHOW NOTES Tom and Jason share their enthusiasm to celebrate those who inspired them [2:55] Jason talks about artistic interpretation and subjective experience [5:24] Tom and Jason bridge the coauthored narrative of life with the malleability of the past [7:01] Jason describes the thrill of the existential chase to experience cognitive orgasm [9:35] Tom and Jason discuss the rapture and power of communicating feeling [12:01] Jason talks about synthesizing complicated ideas into a “flow.” [14:17] Jason reveals how he overcame introversion, anxiety, and fear and stabilized inspiration. [18:34] Tom and Jason discuss hunger and why we are insatiable wanting machines [23:23] Tom and Jason talk about creativity as a form of magic and leveraging paradox [30:08] Tom and Jason discuss the pandemics of the body and mind [34:54] Jason describes feeling the power to do good [44:23] MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE PEOPLE MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Best-selling author, journalist, and entrepreneur Steven Kotler - http://bit.ly/1Kpf918 [3:07] Leading expert on the neuro-physiology of human performance Jaime Wheal - http://bit.ly/1L8K5KS [3:08] One of Jason’s favorite thinkers Ernest Becker -http://bit.ly/2ki44ND [3:45] Media Theorist Marshall Mcluhan - http://bit.ly/1iXGABU [5:14] Well-known scientist Carl Sagan - http://bit.ly/2kEmJnR [7:39] Author of War and Peace Leo Tolstoy - http://bit.ly/2cH4YR4 [10:16] The father of flow state Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - http://bit.ly/1sBl2oL [12:47] Writer, essayist, and professor David Foster Wallace - http://bit.ly/2dqgqkN [17:12] Anthropologist and Pulitzer Prize winner Ernest Becker - http://bit.ly/2lhTq81[27:18] Mythologist, writer, and lecturer Joseph Campbell - http://bit.ly/2jZWDrA [29:00] Journalist and political commentator Bill Moyers - http://huff.to/2kkvd2s [29:23] Author, philosopher, and neuroscientist Sam Harris - http://bit.ly/1jByw0d [35:20] ORGANIZATIONS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Neurohacker, a collective of scientists, technologists, academics, and creatives - http://bit.ly/2leVZrn [3:09] The Flow Genome Project - http://bit.ly/1qGQJy5 [12:46] XPRIZE, an innovative engine and facilitator of exponential change - http://bit.ly/2lhQ7xo [36:50] TALKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Jason Silva on Startalk Radio with Neil deGrasse Tyson - http://bit.ly/2kyfhYZ [7:29] Carl Sagan narrating The Pale Blue Dot - http://bit.ly/1mRyr95 [9:21] The Power of Myth interview with Joseph Campbell - http://bit.ly/2kLNlmf [29:21] TERMS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Psilocybin, a chemical obtained from certain types of fresh or dried mushroom - http://bit.ly/2lf2b2K [9:13] Hedonic Adaptation - http://bit.ly/2kGwkKz [24:29] The Singularity - http://bit.ly/1TMfHXl [37:12] MOVIES, TV, & BOOKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Jodie Foster’s mystical flight in the movie Contact - http://bit.ly/2i2VulV [11:23] La La Land (2016 Movie) Official Trailer - http://bit.ly/2fgou7H [21:02] David Lenson’s book On Drugs - http://amzn.to/2kyIL93 [16:22] Jason’s New TV show “Origins” on National Geographic - http://bit.ly/2kkBpY5 [41:28] FOLLOW JASON SILVA FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/1Mn0zKh INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2lidlU9 TWITTER: https://twitter.com/jasonsilva Tom Bilyeu is the co-founder of 2014 Inc. 500 company Quest Nutrition — a unicorn startup valued at over $1 billion — and the co-founder and host of Impact Theory. Impact Theory is a first-of-its-kind company designed to facilitate global change through the incubation of mission-based businesses and the cultivation of empowering content. Every piece of content Impact Theory creates is meant to underscore the company mission to free people from The Matrix and help them unlock their true potential. Impact Theory exists to inspire the next generation of game-changing companies and creators that will make a true and lasting impact on the world. FOLLOW TOM BILYEU TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2iyjY5P INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2j7vqX8 FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2hPStWo SHOP: https://shop.impacttheory.com/ FACEBOOK GROUP: https://www.facebook.com/groups/impacttheoryleague TOM BILYEU READING LIST: http://impacttheory.com/reading-list/ FOLLOW IMPACT THEORY TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2iC5lN3 INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2hPSGJa FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2iystOf Subscribe to the PODCAST to get episodes early: http://apple.co/2icO5wz
Views: 196368 Tom Bilyeu
"Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase" (Panel 7)
 
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This panel was recorded on December 5, 2009 as part of the conference "Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase." The conference brought together a group of scholars to honor the life and research of Ronald Coase. 2009 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Coase's seminal paper on the Federal Communications Commission. 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of his paper on "The Problem of Social Cost," and his 100th birthday. The panel included: Moderator: Michael Schill, University of Chicago Coase, Edgeworth, and Pigou Gary Becker, University of Chicago Commercial Advertising and the First Amendment Geoffrey Stone, University of Chicago Keynes and Coase Richard A. Posner, University of Chicago The event was sponsored by the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics at the University of Chicago Law School, the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, the Information Economy Project at George Mason University, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the China Center for Economic Research, the Milton Friedman Institute for Research in Economics, and the George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State.
Ramesh Srinivasan: "Whose Global Village? Rethinking How Technology [...]" | Talks at Google
 
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Ramesh Srinivasan studies the relationship between technology, politics and societies across the world. He has been a faculty member at UCLA since 2005 in the Information Studies and Design|Media Arts departments. He is the founder of the UC-wide Digital Cultures Lab, exploring the meaning of technology worldwide as it spreads to the far reaches of our world. He is also the author of the books: “Whose Global Village? Rethinking How Technology Impacts Our World” with NYU Press, and “After the Internet” (with Adam Fish) on Polity Press to be released in December of 2017. Get the book: https://goo.gl/xt4kVu
Views: 1980 Talks at Google
Biblical Series I: Introduction to the Idea of God
 
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Lecture I in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories series from May 16th at Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto. In this lecture, I describe what I consider to be the idea of God, which is at least partly the notion of sovereignty and power, divorced from any concrete sovereign or particular, individual person of power. I also suggest that God, as Father, is something akin to the spirit or pattern inherent in the human hierarchy of authority, which is based in turn on the dominance hierarchies characterizing animals. Q & A Starts: 1:57:25 Producer Credit and thanks to the following $200/month Patreon supporters. Without such support, this series would not have happened: Adam Clarke, Alexander Meckhai’el Beraeros, Andy Baker, Arden C. Armstrong, Badr Amari, BC, Ben Baker, Benjamin Cracknell, Brandon Yates, Chad Grills, Chris Martakis, Christopher Ballew, Craig Morrison, Daljeet Singh, Damian Fink, Dan Gaylinn, Daren Connel, David Johnson, David Tien, Donald Mitchell, Eleftheria Libertatem, Enrico Lejaru, George Diaz, GeorgeB, Holly Lindquist, Ian Trick, James Bradley, James N. Daniel, III, Jan Schanek, Jason R. Ferenc, Jesse Michalak, Joe Cairns, Joel Kurth, John Woolley, Johnny Vinje, Julie Byrne, Keith Jones, Kevin Fallon, Kevin Patrick McSurdy, Kevin Van Eekeren, Kristina Ripka, Louise Parberry, Matt Karamazov, Matt Sattler, Mayor Berkowitz , Michael Thiele, Nathan Claus, Nick Swenson , Patricia Newman, Pisit Mongkolsiriwattana, Robb Kelley, Robin Otto, Ryan Kane, Sabish Balan, Salman Alsabah, Scott Carter, Sean C., Sean Magin, Sebastian Thaci, Shiqi Hu, Soheil Daftarian, Srdan Pavlovic, Starting Ideas, Too Analytical, Trey McLemore, William Wilkinson, Yazz Troche, Zachary Vader --- SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL --- Direct Support: https://www.jordanbpeterson.com/donate Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson --- BOOKS --- 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos: https://jordanbpeterson.com/12-rules-for-life/ Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief: https://jordanbpeterson.com/maps-of-meaning/ --- LINKS --- Website: https://jordanbpeterson.com/ 12 Rules for Life Tour: https://jordanbpeterson.com/events/ Blog: https://jordanbpeterson.com/blog/ Podcast: https://jordanbpeterson.com/podcast/ Reading List: https://jordanbpeterson.com/great-books/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpeterson Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jordan.b.peterson/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drjordanpeterson --- PRODUCTS --- Self Authoring Suite: https://selfauthoring.com/ Understand Myself personality test: https://understandmyself.com/ Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/jordanbpeterson
Views: 4006593 Jordan B Peterson
Cassiano Becker "Spectral Inference of Resting Functional Connectivity in Brain Networks"
 
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April 27 Cassiano Becker "Spectral Inference of Resting Functional Connectivity in Brain Networks" Abstract: Understanding the relationship between the dynamics of neural processes and the anatomical substrate of the brain is a central question in neuroscience. On the one hand, modern neuroimaging technologies, such as diffusion tensor imaging, can be used to construct structural graphs representing the architecture of white matter streamlines crisscrossing the cortex. On the other hand, temporal patterns of neural activity can be used to construct functional graphs representing temporal correlations between brain regions. Although some studies provide evidence that whole-brain functional connectivity is shaped by underlying anatomy, the observed relationship between function and structure is weak, and the rules by which anatomy constrains brain dynamics remain elusive. In this talk, we introduce a methodology to predict with high accuracy the functional connectivity of a subject at rest from his or her structural graph. Using our methodology, we are able to systematically unveil the role of indirect structural paths in the formation of functional correlations. Furthermore, in our empirical evaluations, we observe that the eigen-modes of the predicted functional connectivity are aligned with activity patterns associated to different cognitive systems. Bio: Cassiano Becker is a PhD student in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He earned an M.Sc. in Telecommunications (with distinction) from the University College London, and a B.Eng. in Electrical Engineering from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Before starting his doctoral studies, he worked as systems engineer, software developer and project manager in technology companies such as Harris Corporation and Siemens. His research interests include applications of network models, dynamical systems and machine learning to neuroscience, brain-computer interfaces and other cyber-physical systems.
Views: 102 Penn Ese
Conférence avec Maurice Parodi - Partie 5 -  Entreprise coopérative/Pédagogie coopérative
 
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Partie 5 - Transfert du modèle de la coopération dans l'entreprise vers celui de la pédagogie coopérative Cinq principes d'une entreprise coopérative transfert vers la pédagogie coopérative 1 - La libre adhésion (libre entrée, libre sortie). La libre démarche de l'apprenant (motivation, liberté d'apprendre et projet personnel). 2 - La gestion démocratique (une personne = une voix). L'apprenant est le premier acteur de sa formation (modèle de l'autoformation accompagnée ou groupe classe autogestionnaire). 3 - La lucrativité limitée (rémunérer le travail plutôt que le capital). L'éducation à la coopération doit être à la fois source d'enrichissement personnel (capital humain) et source d'enrichissement collectif (capital social). 4 - L'intercoopération (coopération entre coopératives). L'intercoopération (dans le groupe classe et entre les classes). Ex. correspondances interclasses de C. Freinet. 5 - L'éducation des membres à la coopération. L'apprentissage de la coopération pour apprendre la démocratie. Paolo Freire, (2013). Pédagogie de l'autonomie. Carl Rogers, (2013, 4e éd.). Liberté pour apprendre. Gary S. Becker, (1994, 3e éd.). Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education Vidéo Youtube sur Célestin Freinet - émission de France Culture : "L'école moderne de Célestin Freinet. La fabrique de l'Histoire."
Views: 392 Formateurs UGS
Kevin Murphy and Robert Topel - Some Economics of Professionalism (February 15, 2012)
 
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Some Economics of Professionalism: Which Professions Need 'Professionalism' the Most? Chair: Kevin Murphy, MD, University of Chicago and Robert Topel, PhD, University of Chicago Wednesday, February 15, 2012 This lecture is part of an ongoing seminar series on Medical Professionalism and the Future of American Medicine The views expressed by Dr. Murphy and Dr. Topel are not necessarily those of the MacLean Center.
Views: 1225 MacLean Center
Fragile Beliefs and the Price of Uncertainty
 
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Consumers, investors, business managers, and others make decisions based on their assessment of current and future economic conditions, but they make these forecasts with varying degrees of confidence. In this Becker Brown Bag talk, Lars Peter Hansen discusses how this uncertainty influences market outcomes, policies, and investor compensations in financial markets.
Racism, Teenage Oral Sex and Voting: The Rational Economics of an Irrational World (2008)
 
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Harford argues that rational behavior is more widespread than expected in the larger population. He uses economic principles to draw forth the rational elements of supposedly illogical behaviors to illustrate his point. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0812977874/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0812977874&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=966d5871393eee0ca4e411cd3c6536b0 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Logic_of_Life Rational Choice Theory, also known as Choice Theory or Rational Action Theory, is a framework for understanding and often formally modeling social and economic behavior. Rationality, interpreted as "wanting more rather than less of a good", is widely used as an assumption of the behavior of individuals in microeconomic models and analysis and appears in almost all economics textbook treatments of human decision-making. It is also central to some of modern political science, sociology, and philosophy. It attaches "wanting more" to instrumental rationality, which involves seeking the most cost-effective means to achieve a specific goal without reflecting on the worthiness of that goal. Gary Becker was an early proponent of applying rational actor models more widely. He won the 1992 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his studies of discrimination, crime, and human capital. The "rationality" described by rational choice theory is different from the colloquial and most philosophical use of the word. Typically, "rationality" means "sane" or "in a thoughtful clear-headed manner,." Rational choice theory uses a specific and narrower definition of "rationality" simply to mean that an individual acts as if balancing costs against benefits to arrive at action that maximizes personal advantage. In rational choice theory, all decisions, crazy or sane, are postulated as mimicking such a "rational" process. Thus rationality is seen as a property of patterns of choices, rather than of individual choices: there is nothing irrational in preferring fish to meat the first time, but there is something irrational in preferring fish to meat and preferring meat to fish, regularly. Work done under the rational choice theory paradigm typically does not investigate the origins, nature, or validity of human motivations (why we want what we want). Instead, it takes the biological, psychological, sociological, moral, and ethical roots of behavior and preferences as given and theorizes with these factors fixed. Because rational choice theory lacks understanding of consumer motivation, some economists restrict its use to understanding business behavior where goals are usually very clear. As Armen Alchian points out, competition in the market encourages businesses to maximize profits (in order to survive). Because that goal is significantly less vacuous than "maximizing utility" and the like, rational choice theory is apt. Although models used in rational choice theory are diverse, all assume individuals choose the best action according to unchanging and stable preference functions and constraints facing them. Most models have additional assumptions. Those proponents of rational choice models associated with the Chicago school of economics do not claim that a model's assumptions are a full description of reality, only that good models can aid reasoning and provide help in formulating falsifiable hypothesis, whether intuitive or not. In this view, the only way to judge the success of hypothesis is empirical tests. To use an example from Milton Friedman, if a theory that says that the behavior of the leaves of a tree is explained by their rationality passes the empirical test, it is seen as successful. However, it may not be possible to empirically test or falsify the rationality assumption, so that the theory leans heavily toward being a tautology (true by definition) since there is no effort to explain individual goals. Nonetheless, empirical tests can be conducted on some of the results derived from the models. In recent years the theoretical vision of rational choice theory has been subject to more and more doubt by the experimental results of behavioral economics. This criticism has encouraged many social scientists to utilize concepts of bounded rationality to replace the "absolute" rationality of rational choice theory: this points to the difficulties of data-processing and decision-making associated with many choices in economics, political science, and sociology. More economists these days are learning from other fields, such as psychology, in order to get a more accurate view of human decision-making than offered by rational choice theory. For example, the behavioral economist and experimental psychologist Daniel Kahneman won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2002 for his work in this field. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rational_actor
Views: 24759 The Film Archives
Milton Friedman Speaks: Equality and Freedom in the Free Enterprise System (B1238) - Full Video
 
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If the government has the power and responsibility to promote equality of income, then how do we define the concept of equality? Jefferson, in his Declaration of Independence, meant equality before the law, a concept necessary precisely because people are not equal in tastes, values, or capacities. Later, equality came to mean equality of opportunity - the chance to run a fair race. Within a free market system, both definitions are consistent with other values: Efficiency, justice, and liberty. More recently, equality has come to mean equality of outcome. Equality of outcome cannot be mandated, cannot be insured. Any serious attempt to achieve it would destroy freedom. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org/ Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net/ Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv/
Views: 22952 Free To Choose Network
Martha Nussbaum, "Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach"
 
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International agencies used to measure the quality of life in a nation simply by looking at GDP per capita. Recently that approach has been challenged by an approach that focuses on people's "capabilities": what they are actually able to do and be, their substantial freedoms, in some central areas of life. As one of the architects of that approach, Nussbaum will discuss its origins and structure, and the arguments for and against it. Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago Law School. This talk was recorded March 2, 2010 as part of the Chicago's Best Ideas series.
Dr Jordan B Peterson | *full-length* 2014 interview
 
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**Religion, Myth, Science, Truth** | an evening of Darwinian thought with Dr. Jordan B. Peterson Please check us out on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/transliminal See below for Table of Contents. *** 0:00 INTRO: PETERSON'S JOURNEY 9:45 RELIGION: CROWD-CONTROL, NAIVE SCIENCE, OR NEITHER? 10:08 "They're straw man arguments" 11:45 Multiple motivational systems, different levels of thinking 13:32 Fundamental presuppositions 14:13 Dawkins vs. Christianity: like a "smart 13 year old boy" 14:36 INTERMISSION: PETERSON ADDRESSES HIS DOG 14:44 SCIENTISTS MISREADING RELIGION 15:52 Different systems of thought, different purposes 16:00 More than one basic assumption is possible 17:13 ENTER: DOMINANCE HIERARCHIES 17:19 What's real is what's persistent across time 17:33 Dominance hierarchies and lobsters 17:58 We're evolutionarily adapted to hierarchies 18:14 HIERARCHIES, RELIGIOUS THINKING, AND SUBJECTIVITY 18:42 "Being" as not reducible to material reality 19:12 The road to nihilism and authoritarianism 19:57 DETERMINING THE TRUTH OF A THEORY 20:07 Newton or Darwin? Choose one. You can't have both. 20:20 Nitzche's "Truth serves life" is a Darwinian idea 20:38 No idea if our knoweldge will help us survive over deep time 20:50 Answer to: "But look what we've built with it" 21:20 Crossing Ebola and Smallpox: some science is clearly insane 22:30 Check your assumptions about reality 23:45 Darwinism: truth is what enables survival within chaos, period. 25:03 Dawkins is a Newtonian not a Darwinian 26:09 Reductionism leaves things out. This has consequences. 27:27 The pragmatic problem: truth for what? 28:09 DEEP DARWINISM & RELIGION 28:15 Religion as evolved knowledge about action 29:40 American Pragmatist philosophers: the true Darwinians 30:17 Godel, the stock market and reality 31:02 TRUTH AS ACTION 31:44 Truth from the bottom up: lobsters, wolves, humans 34:27 Ethics: evolved patterns in dominance hierarchies 39:23 Dogs, chimps and humans: hierarchy navigators 44:45 From dominance hierarchies to archetypes: ancient Egypt 52:36 The soul 55:50 Jung on Christianity, truth and speech 59:07 Truth versus the lie 1:00:52 THE INTELLECT 1:00:52 The totalitarian intellect 1:02:43 Have you made thinking your God? 1:03:38 Attention trumps thinking 1:04:11 EVOLUTIONARY ROOTS OF WESTERN RELIGION 1:04:33 Christ as a metahero 1:04:43 The deep roots of myth 1:07:00 Chaos monsters 1:08:55 Myth as behavioural truth 1:09:37 "Darwin trumps Newton" 1:10:02 "Dawkins is a rationalist...not a darwinian" 1:10:07 Darwinian time, Darwinian truth 1:13:57 Mesopotamian myth as successful behaviour blueprint 1:17:36 FROM NATURE TO HERO MYTHOLOGY 1:19:33 Religious stories model being as a field for action 1:21:13 Our religious task 1:21:47 Religion as hero mythology 1:22:30 "You...don't know that you know the story." 1:23:58 PIAGET AND PRE-RATIONAL MORALITY 1:25:16 We learn to act before we learn the rules 1:26:18 Moses the Judge: observer of emergent moral patterns 1:27:54 "Opiate of the masses" as naive industrial era thinking 1:28:43 METAPHORICAL THOUGHT 1:29:11 Hyperactive agency detection module: it goes deeper 1:31:00 The brain as archetype detection organ 1:32:08 Women are nature 1:33:48 Metaphor, myth and science 1:36:00 SCIENCE AND MORAL TRUTH 1:37:52 Are all scientists devoted to the truth? 1:39:44 How do we judge if science is ethical? 1:42:57 Evil as archetypically real 1:44:06 The reality of good and evil 1:45:09 Science and mythology: which is embedded in which? 1:48:17 EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY AND DEEP TIME 1:49:13 RELIGIOUS METAPHYSICS: OPTIONAL? 1:49:20 Is God an old man with a beard in the sky? 1:51:12 Hurricane Katrina, corruption and poverty 1:52:12 The significance of the bible 1:53:43 The genius of the sacrifice 1:55:50 INTERLUDE: TRIANGULATING MEANING 1:58:02 END OF RELIGION? 1:58:02 On new atheists' claims of a secular rational future 1:58:29 On new age spirituality 1:58:49 New atheist rationalist optimism so absurd it must be motivated 1:59:18 REDUCING RELIGION VS. EXPANDING EVOLUTION 1:59:40 "[The Jungian alternative]...is terrifying [for people]" 1:59:57 "[Jung's work]...puts enlightenment thinkers to shame" 2:00:17 "Which ideas have you? ... We're like playthings of the gods" 2:01:09 JUNG: STUDYING INFORMATION, NOT MATTER 2:02:23 "If you study religion properly, it'll demolish your personality" 2:08:16 METAPHOR VS REALITY: NOT OBVIOUS 2:10:11 Ancients: phenomenologists, not scientists 2:12:24 Religion as spatial 2:13:24 HUMANS: EFFICIENT COMPLEXITY MANAGERS 2:13:48 Reality in terms of resolution 2:15:52 There's lots worse than death 2:16:46 On Becker's "The Denial of Death": smart but mistaken 2:19:40 Death's not the problem, it's complexity 2:21:06 THE MULTICULTURAL DIMENSION 2:27:35 FROM THEORY TO ACTION 2:28:40 Fixing what bugs you 2:29:30 Overcoming the lie 2:31:54 Peterson's experience with truth 2:34:45 The most powerful thing we can do CC-BY-NC-SA
Views: 336834 Transliminal
Using Text to Quantify Policy Uncertainty
 
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In this Friedman Forum talk for undergraduates, Steven J. Davis demonstrates the use of automated text analysis methods for quantifying policy uncertainty and measuring its economic impact.
Adam Frank: "Light of the Stars: Alien Worlds and the Fate of the Earth" | Talks at Google
 
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Astrophysicist Adam Frank (contributor to the New York Times, NPR's 13.7 blog, and science advisor for Marvel's "Dr. Strange") discusses his new book "Light of the Stars." In this lively, brain-stretching talk he urges us to "think like a planet," as we grapple with climate change, and contemplate the possibility of alien civilizations. Get the book here: https://goo.gl/fgbnYi
Views: 5181 Talks at Google
Political Philosophy Workshop with Robert Paul Wolff
 
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April 21, 2016 Robert Paul Wolff is the keynote of this Political Philosophy work shop. The workshop meets weekly to discuss work in progress by faculty and graduate students from Brown University, as well as several outside scholars each semester. Those who attend come from several disciplines, but especially from the departments of Political Science and Philosophy. The emphasis is on constructive critical discussion of work in progress. Unless otherwise specified, the meetings will take place from 4-6 pm in the Lownes room of the John Hay Library Brown University
Views: 6861 Brown University
An epidemic of beauty sickness | Renee Engeln | TEDxUConn 2013
 
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Girls grow up hearing both implicit and explicit messages suggesting that the most important attribute they can strive for is beauty. The chronic focus on beauty directs cognitive, financial, and emotional resources away from other more important goals. Dr. Engeln considers whether there is hope for treating the epidemic of beauty sickness and what it might be like to live in a world where women feel free to spend less time in front of the mirror and more time changing the world. Dr. Engeln is a psychology professor and body image researcher at Northwestern University. She is the author of "Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women" (Harper, 2017). For more information, go to beautysick.com. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 546672 TEDx Talks
Liberation Psychology and Social Change: An Introduction to Ignacio Martín-Baró
 
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On November 11, 2013, the Boston College Center for Human Rights and International Justice hosted this event with Center Associate Director, Professor M. Brinton Lykes. This presentation and dialogue presents some of the key ideas developed by social psychologist and Jesuit priest, Ignacio Martín-Baró, and the challenges that his life and death present for psychologists and activist-scholars in the 21st century. The Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Boston College addresses the increasingly interdisciplinary needs of human rights work. Through multidisciplinary training programs, applied research, and the interaction of scholars with practitioners, the Center aims to nurture a new generation of scholars and practitioners in the United States and abroad who draw upon the strengths of many disciplines, and the wisdom of rigorous ethical training in the attainment of human rights and international justice.
Gary Becker | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Gary Becker Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Gary Stanley Becker (; December 2, 1930 – May 3, 2014) was an American economist and empiricist. He was a professor of economics and sociology at the University of Chicago. Described as "the most important social scientist in the past 50 years" by The New York Times, Becker was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1992 and received the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007. A 2011 survey of economics professors named Becker their favorite living economist over the age of 60, followed by Ken Arrow and Robert Solow.Becker was one of the first economists to branch into what were traditionally considered topics that belonged to sociology, including racial discrimination, crime, family organization, and drug addiction (see rational addiction). He was known for arguing that many different types of human behavior can be seen as rational and utility maximizing. His approach included altruistic behavior of human behavior by defining individuals' utility appropriately. He was also among the foremost exponents of the study of human capital. Becker was also credited with the "rotten kid theorem."
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Economic Ideas Forum
 
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On April 19, 2018 the Center for Economic Research at Purdue held the Economic Ideas Forum which included this fireside chat with Nobel Laureate James J. Heckman, Center for the Economics of Human Development, The University of Chicago and David Hummels, Dean of Krannert School of Management and Professor of Economics.
Views: 207 Purdue Krannert
Social capital
 
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In sociology, social capital is the expected collective or economic benefits derived from the preferential treatment and cooperation between individuals and groups. Although different social sciences emphasize different aspects of social capital, they tend to share the core idea "that social networks have value". Just as a screwdriver (physical capital) or a university education (cultural capital or human capital) can increase productivity (both individual and collective), so do social contacts affect the productivity of individuals and groups. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1782 Audiopedia
Professor Jeffrey Smith, Malim Harding Visitorship Lecture
 
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"Reflections on the Evaluation of Active Labo(u)r Market Policies: Two Cheers for Conditional Independence" University of Toronto, February 1, 2018 Jeffrey Smith is the Paul Heyne Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Active labour market policies are those programs run by government that, through intervention in the labour market, help the unemployed to find work, for example, by providing training schemes. Professor Smith examines experimental and non-experimental methods for the evaluation of such interventions, with particular application to social and educational programs. A notable figure in the analysis of evidence-based public policy and a leading expert on the role of social and policy experiments, and their impact on public policy, he has also written papers examining the labor market effects of university quality and “mismatch” and the use of statistical treatment rules to assign persons to government programs. The Malim Harding Visitorship in Political Science & Economics was endowed in 1987 by the late C. Malim Harding, first Chair of the University of Toronto's Governing Council, to invite distinguished scholars to U of T with a special focus on current issues in public policy.
Views: 167 Economics U of T
The Behavioral Shift
 
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In this undergraduate-organized panel, Colin Camerer, Andrew Caplin, and David Laibson—leading behavioral scholars—explore how their research has given valuable insight into economic models of human behavior.
Imagining the Extraordinary: The Inspired
 
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In a symposium on scientific illustration from the Renaissance to the digital age, historians specializing in the scientific illustrations of the Renaissance with contemporary scientists, technologists and artists to explore the longstanding relationship between science and illustration. On day two, the morning panel focused on "the inspired." Speaker Biography: Lilla Vekerdy is head of special collections at Smithsonian Libraries. Speaker Biography: Catherine Newell is assistant professor of religious studies at the University of Miami and Larson Fellow in Health and Spirituality at the Library of Congress. Speaker Biography: Greg Dunn is an artist and neuroscientist. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=8392
Views: 239 LibraryOfCongress
Information Flow and Graph Structure in Online Social Networks
 
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Jon Kleinberg of Cornell University presents a model that tracks the sharing and dispersion of information through social media networks.
"Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase" (Panel 5)
 
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This panel was recorded on December 5, 2009 as part of the conference "Markets, Firms and Property Rights: A Celebration of the Research of Ronald Coase." The conference brought together a group of scholars to honor the life and research of Ronald Coase. 2009 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Coase's seminal paper on the Federal Communications Commission. 2010 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of his paper on "The Problem of Social Cost," and his 100th birthday. The panel included: Moderator: Kevin Murphy, University of Chicago Competence as a Random Variable: One More Tribute to Ronald Coase Richard A. Epstein, University of Chicago R.H. Coase and the Neoclassical Model of the Economic System Harold Demsetz, UCLA Measuring Coase's Influence William Landes, University of Chicago The event was sponsored by the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics at the University of Chicago Law School, the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, the Information Economy Project at George Mason University, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the China Center for Economic Research, the Milton Friedman Institute for Research in Economics, and the George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State.
Webcast: Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-First Century"
 
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http://hoc.ilr.cornell.edu Few books in recent years have stirred as much controversy and excitement as the release of Thomas Piketty's "Capital in the Twenty-First Century." Reviews have described the book as a "political and theoretical bulldozer." Fundamentally rethinking the foundations of macroeconomics, Pikketty explains the deep connection between income inequality and capital returns. His theories challenge existing economic thought in ways that have captured the attention of those interested in public policy, economic theory, and the history of capitalism. Cornell's History of Capitalism Initiative recently hosted a webcast on the book with some Cornell's top scholars in Economics, History and Law. Moderator/Host: Jeffereson Cowie , ILR Dean's Professor Chair and Chair, Department of Labor Relations, Law, and History Presenters/Panelists: Ed Baptist, Associate Professor of History Robert Frank, Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management Aziz Rana, Associate Professor of Law
Views: 1708 Cornell ILR