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Alveoli: Gas Exchange
 
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Revision notes and practice question for gas exchange: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/gas-exchange-11804216 Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sciencesauce_online/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/science_sauce Facebook: https://facebook.com/sciencesauceonline/ The alveoli ("many alveoli", "one alveolus") are the sites of gas exchange in the lungs. They are tiny air sacks sometimes described as being cauliflower-shaped. Oxygen diffuses across the lining of the alveoli and blood capillaries into and into red blood cells. Carbon dioxide diffuses from the blood to the alveoli. A concentration gradient is maintained by breathing as well as blood flow. The main adaptation of the gas exchange surface are: 1. Large surface area 2. Thin wall 3. Moist lining 4. Good blood supply 5. Good ventilation
Views: 254819 Science Sauce
Gas exchange
 
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Why do our bodies need to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide with the air, and how do they do it? This video is part of our Body Systems unit. You can find out more about Stile at https://stileeducation.com/ or check out the unit here: https://stileapp.com/au/library/publishers/cosmos-magazine/compilations/cosmos-lessons/5791d5d0-d006-4efb-8974-9294b6b56048
Views: 50193 Stile Education
Mechanism of exchange of gases/very simplified lecture.
 
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U can like my Facebook page ie. Vipin Sharma Biology Blogs for more information regarding every national level competitive exam in which biology is a part . Like this video share it with your frnds n subscribe to my channel if u r new. Thanq so much for supporting me guys 👍 😊. https://unacademy.com/user/vks199711-4457 Open this link and click on "follow" button as well as "login" to support me on Unacademy. Do share with all your friends. https://mbasic.facebook.com/Vipin-Sharma-Biology-Blogs-588472744670315/?__xt__=11.%7B%22event%22%3A%22visit_page_tab%22%2C%22user_id%22%3A100003119064758%2C%22page_id%22%3A588472744670315%7D
Gas Exchange Physiology Animation - MADE EASY
 
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Gas Exchange Physiology Animation ✔✔✔FOR MORE MEDICAL VIDEOS VISIT: http://freemedicalvideos.com/ Website: http://www.medical-institution.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Medicalinstit... Twitter: https://twitter.com/USMLE_HighYield This information is intended for educational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as medical advice. Please consult your physician for advice about changes that may affect your health. This Animation video teaches you the basic concept of Gas Exchange Physiology in the respiratory system. What is gas exchange How does gas exchange work Why is gas exchange important Oxygen exchange Respiratory system
Views: 609851 Medical Institution
Respiration Gas Exchange
 
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https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 585536 Armando Hasudungan
Gas Exchange in Plants
 
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Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade : 10 Subject :Biology Lesson : Life process respiration Topic: Gas Exchange in Plants Gas Exchange in Plants. In order to carry on photosynthesis, green plants need a supply of carbon dioxide and a means of disposing of oxygen. In order to carry on cellular respiration, plant cells need oxygen and a means of disposing of carbon. Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Views: 34436 CBSE
GCSE Science Biology (9-1) Gas exchange in the lungs
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at how gases are exchanged in the lungs. We start by looking at the overall structure of the lungs and then explore how the alveoli are adapted for maximum diffusion of gases in and out of the bloodstream. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Image credits: All images were created by and are the property of Autonomy Education Ltd.
Views: 141757 Freesciencelessons
Know more about Exchange Of Gases. NEET Zoology XI Breathing and Exchange of Gases
 
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Know more about Exchange Of Gases. NEET Zoology XI Breathing and Exchange of Gases Exchange of gases in human lungs and tissues: The air reaches the alveoli of the lungs during the inspiration. The atmospheric air contains: Nitrogen - 78% Oxygen - 21 % Carbon dioxide - 0.03% The interchange of gases in the lungs occurs between the blood of the blood capillaries and the air of the alveoli of the lungs. Gases have some properties which are as follows: Gases always diffuse from an area of higher concentration to the area of lower concentration. During respiration the lungs and the respiratory tract are never empty of air. Instead, there is a tidal volume of air (about 500 ml). The total pressure exerted on the walls of the alveoli by the mixture of gases is the same as atmospheric pressure, 760 mm of Hg (millimeters of mercury). Each gas in the mixture exerts a part of the total pressure proportional to its concentration which is called the partial pressure. Table : Partial Pressure of Respiratory Gases (A) Pulmonary Gas Exchange (Gas Exchange in Lungs between alveoli and deoxygenated blood) Diagrammatic representation of exchange of gases at the alveolus and the body tissues with blood and transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide (B) Gas Exchange in Tissues (between oxygenated blood and tissues) Transport of gases in Blood: Blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the heart and from the heart to various body parts. The blood also brings carbon dioxide from the body parts to the heart and then to the lungs. A. Transport of Oxygen: As dissolved gas: About 3% of oxygen in the blood is dissolved in the plasma which carries oxygen to the body cells. As oxyhaemoglobin: About 97% of oxygen is carried in combination with haemoglobin of the erythrocytes. Bohr’s Effect : The relationship between the pCO2 and the percentage saturation of Hb with O2 (or affinity of Hb for O2) is known as Bohr’s effect. increase in pCO2 decrease affinity of Hb for O2 therefore promotes dissociation of Hb(O2)4 → Hb + 4O2.Ø decrease in pCO2 increase affinity of Hb for O2 therefore stimulates association of O2. Hb+ 4O2 → Hb + 4(O2)4. A Diagram of a section of an alveolus with a pulmonary capillary For more such resources go to https://goo.gl/Eh96EY Website: https://www.learnpedia.in/
Views: 9619 Learnpedia
Gas Exchange in Alveoli Animation - Pathway of Air through Respiratory System Video – How Lungs Work
 
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Air first enters the body through the mouth or nose, quickly moves to the pharynx (throat), passes through the larynx (voice box), enters the trachea, which branches into a left and right bronchus within the lungs and further divides into smaller and smaller branches called bronchioles. The smallest bronchioles end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli, which inflate during inhalation, and deflate during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs. It occurs in the lungs between the alveoli and a network of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which are located in the walls of the alveoli. The walls of the alveoli actually share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory system and the bloodstream. Oxygen molecules attach to red blood cells, which travel back to the heart. At the same time, the carbon dioxide molecules in the alveoli are blown out of the body with the next exhalation. The primary function of the respiratory system is to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and reaches the alveoli. The layers of cells lining the alveoli and the surrounding capillaries are each only one cell thick and are in very close contact with each other. This barrier between air and blood averages about 1 micron (1/10,000 of a centimeter, or 0.000039 inch) in thickness. Oxygen passes quickly through this air-blood barrier into the blood in the capillaries. Similarly, carbon dioxide passes from the blood into the alveoli and is then exhaled. Oxygenated blood travels from the lungs through the pulmonary veins and into the left side of the heart, which pumps the blood to the rest of the body (see Biology of the Heart : Function of the Heart). Oxygen-deficient, carbon dioxide-rich blood returns to the right side of the heart through two large veins, the superior vena cava and the inferior vena cava. Then the blood is pumped through the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. Gas Exchange Between Alveoli and Capillaries: To support the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, about 5 to 8 liters (about 1.3 to 2.1 gallons) of air per minute are brought in and out of the lungs, and about three tenths of a liter of oxygen is transferred from the alveoli to the blood each minute, even when the person is at rest. At the same time, a similar volume of carbon dioxide moves from the blood to the alveoli and is exhaled. During exercise, it is possible to breathe in and out more than 100 liters (about 26 gallons) of air per minute and extract 3 liters (a little less than 1 gallon) of oxygen from this air per minute. The rate at which oxygen is used by the body is one measure of the rate of energy expended by the body. Breathing in and out is accomplished by respiratory muscles. Air is brought to the alveoli in small doses (called the tidal volume), by breathing in (inhalation) and out (exhalation) through the respiratory airways, a set of relatively narrow and moderately long tubes which start at the nose or mouth and end in the alveoli of the lungs in the chest. Air moves in and out through the same set of tubes, in which the flow is in one direction during inhalation, and in the opposite direction during exhalation. During each inhalation, at rest, approximately 500 ml of fresh air flows in through the nose. Its is warmed and moistened as it flows through the nose and pharynx. By the time it reaches the trachea the inhaled air's temperature is 37 °C and it is saturated with water vapor. On arrival in the alveoli it is diluted and thoroughly mixed with the approximately 2.5–3.0 liters of air that remained in the alveoli after the last exhalation. This relatively large volume of air that is semi-permanently present in the alveoli throughout the breathing cycle is known as the functional residual capacity (FRC). At the beginning of inhalation the airways are filled with unchanged alveolar air, left over from the last exhalation. This is the dead space volume, which is usually about 150 ml. It is the first air to re-enter the alveoli during inhalation. Only after the dead space air has returned to the alveoli does the remainder of the tidal volume (500 ml - 150 ml = 350 ml) enter the alveoli. The entry of such a small volume of fresh air with each inhalation, ensures that the composition of the FRC hardly changes during the breathing cycle.
Views: 33009 AniMed
Countercurrent Gas Exchange in Fish Gills
 
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Description of Countercurrent Exchange in fish gills as an example of form relating to function in biology
Views: 305624 Craig Savage
Gaseous exchange between alveoli and capillaries
 
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A little more detail of the exchange of oxygen between alveoli and capillaries
श्वसन अंग – Breathing and Respiration in Human  The air we take in– in Hindi
 
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This Hindi video discusses about breathing process in human and explains how oxygen reaches cells. It is mapped to class 10 biology chapter – Life Processes (Respiration) About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.bodhaguru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.bodhaguru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/Bodhaguru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 51311 Bodhaguru
Gas Exchange in Fish
 
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Another video on Exchange! In this video we examine the gills as an example of an exchange surface. We also discuss how fish pass water over their gills and how countercurrent flow maintains favourable exchange of oxygen. Made for AQA AS Level students studying Unit 2: Variety of Living Organisms.
Views: 145086 Mr Pollock
Lung Anatomy and Physiology | Gas Exchange in the Lungs Respiration Transport Alveoli Nursing
 
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Lung anatomy and physiology of gas exchange in the lung alveoli during respiration nursing lecture. This lecture details the anatomy of the lungs and how gas exchange in the lungs takes place between carbon dioxide and oxygen. The lung is made up of many components that participant in gas exchange. Inhaled air with oxygen enters into the upper respiratory system via the nose or mouth then through the nasal cavities, larynx, and trachea which splits at the carina into the right and left bronchus (primary bronchi). The primary bronchi and pulmonary vein and artery enter into the lungs at the hilum. The pulmonary artery delivers unoxygenated blood to the lungs, and the pulmonary vein delivers oxygenated blood back to the heart. The primary bronchi branches off into the lobar bronchi (also called secondary bronchi) then into the segmental bronchi (also called tetiary bronchi), and then into even smaller areas such as the bronchioles. The bronchioles connect to the alveolar sacs via the alveolar ducts. Gas exchange occurs in the alveolar sac within the alveoli. The alveoli sacs contain capillaries that help with transporting carbon dioxide and oxygen in and out of the body. The pulmonary artery brings unoxygenated blood through the capillary and carbon dioxide transports across the thin capillary wall and is transported out of the body through exhalation. Then the inhaled oxygen transports across the capillary wall onto the red blood cells which is taken via the pulmonary vein back to the heart to replenish the body with fresh oxygenated blood. Other facts about lung anatomy: the right lung has three lobes while the left lung has two lobes. The lung is made up of two layers: visceral pleura (surrounds the lungs) and parietal pleura (attaches to the thoracic cavity). In between these layers, is a small space of fluid that allows the lungs to glide on each other during inhalation and exhalation. Lung A & P quiz: https://www.registerednursern.com/lung-anatomy-and-physiology-quiz/ Notes: https://www.registerednursern.com/lung-anatomy-and-physiology-review-notes/ Respiratory Nursing Lectures: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXxyukzyHpqYrJntLbv0aGE Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 134919 RegisteredNurseRN
How the Body Works : The Exchange of Gases
 
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The Exchange of Gases As air is breathed into the lungs, exchange of gases takes place at the highly folded, moist surface of air sacs. These are richly supplied with blood capillaries, which take up oxygen and give up carbon dioxide.
Views: 70238 Daniel Izzo
Gas Exchange at different Places in Human Body
 
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TN-06-Science http://inpeth.com/concept/ZVaQgdC5MLJH14k9AlaHhGCXoZlJCnNscP3vyygw_teU7O3B5aNqI-lj7mBTyidN In our body, there are 3 stages, at which exchange of gases takes place. First place is at the nose, second is in lungs, and third is in cell. Air enters our body through nose. We inhale oxygen and all other gases present in the air, and exhale carbon dioxide and other gases which are not useful to us. In the lungs, at alveoli, oxygen is absorbed by Red blood cells. At the same time, carbon dioxide present in blood is released. This absorbed oxygen is taken to cells where it is combined with carbohydrate to produce energy. Carbon dioxide is produced during this process which is absorbed in blood by red blood cells. Carbon dioxide is then taken to lungs and exhaled by our nose.
Views: 20 Inpeth Videos
Gas Exchange
 
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In this Anatomy and Physiology lesson Mr. Zabel explains how gas exchange takes place within the alveoli and the respiratory membranes. He further explains how partial pressure changes as air travels through the respiratory and circulatory system. He also explains how oxygen and carbon dioxide travel though the tissue and to the alveoli.
Views: 286 mrbiology15
Gas Exchange in Plants
 
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A mini lessons for AS Biology Students. This relates to the AQA Specification, Unit 2: Variety of Living Organisms. Covered in this lesson: -Structure of the leaf -Structure and function of the stomata -Exchange in the leaf As ever, we're using the Toole & Toole AQA AS Biology textbook Enjoy!
Views: 83221 Mr Pollock
Gas exchange in different animals | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Respiration is carried out by all living things. Animals need oxygen to carry out aerobic respiration and they need to get rid of the waste product called carbon dioxide. This is called gas exchange. Swapping one gas for another. Animals have evolved different mechanisms for carrying out gaseous exchange. The most important thing is to create a large surface area, the bigger the surface area the faster diffusion of the gases can occur. Secondly they all have a good blood supply. You want to get oxygen into the blood and carbon dioxide out as quickly as possible so the blood travels very close to the exchange surface to once again maximise diffusion. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Stomata and Gas Exchange Animation
 
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Stomata and Gas Exchange Animation #Please → Like, comment, share and subscribe 👍🏻❤️
Views: 31262 McGraw-Hill Animations
Fish Head Gills Gas Exchange System Dissection GCSE A Level Biology Practical Skills
 
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Ava Hearts Biology presents: Fish Gill Dissection for GCSE and A Level. Ever wondered what a counter current gas exchange system looks like? All dissection samples curtesy of www.samplesforschools.com Coming Soon! Workshops and #watchavalive #avaheartsbiology events, please visit www.avaheartsbiology.co.uk Please note:The animal material used in this dissection has not been produced for the purpose of the video – it is a regular by-product of the meat industry, available for consumption from some butchers, or part of the waste stream if not used for dissection. This video is for educational and demonstration purposes only. If you undertake your own dissection please take due safety precautions: - Take care with sharp dissecting tools. - Observe careful hygiene precautions after the dissection.
Views: 23424 Ava Hearts Biology
Hemoglobin moves O2 and CO2 | Human anatomy and physiology | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Learn the two ways that oxygen moves from the lungs to the tissues, and the three ways that carbon dioxide returns from the tissues to the lungs. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/introduction-to-hematologic/v/fetal-hemoglobin-and-hematocrit?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/introduction-to-hematologic/v/hemoglobin?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 481781 khanacademymedicine
Breathing and Exchange of Gases in Hindi-Transport of Gases
 
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Breathing and Exchange of Gases in Hindi-Transport of Gases : In this lesson, Diksha discusses about Transport of Respiratory gases. The lesson also covers the entire process of the respiratory system of a Human Body. This lesson is designed for the pre-medical students. To watch this entire collection of lessons and to discuss with the educator go to : https://goo.gl/xV5ZcX For more educational lessons by top educators visit http://unacademy.in
Views: 6016 Unacademy NEET
10th Class Biology, Ch 10, Gaseous Exchange in Plants - Matric Class Biology
 
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ilmkidunya.com has brought to you Lecture of Usama Qamar on "10th Class Biology Chapter 10 Gaseous Exchange. Topic 10.1 Gaseous Exchange in Plants". For more videos of Usama Qamar visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study , https://www.instutor.com This lecture is specially recorded for students of 10th class, 10th class from all Punjab Boards and is based on the current curriculum of study for Biology book. All these lectures are conducted in Urdu/English medium to facilitate Pakistani students.
Views: 35084 ilmkidunya
Biology Help: The Respiratory System - Gas Exchange In The Alveoli Explained In 2 Minutes!!
 
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Check out the following links below! Over 1000+ Medical Questions: http://www.5minuteschool.com DONATE + SUPPORT US: http://paypal.me/5minuteschool Patreon: https://goo.gl/w841fz Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/5MinuteSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/5minuteschool My personal Instagram: http://instagram.com/shaz.s11 Contact us: [email protected]
Views: 66499 5MinuteSchool
Gas Exchange in Insects
 
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In this video, we look at the tracheal system in insects. This is a nice quick and short topic, but can be tricky! - The overall structure of the system - Ventilation - Limitations - Preventing water loss This video was made for AQA AS Level Biology students studying Unit 2.
Views: 98806 Mr Pollock
breathing and exchange of Gases (inspiration & expiration)
 
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how Human breathing takes place
How we respire, respiratory system and exchange of gases, diffusion
 
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A short video to help you understand how the exchange of gases takes place in the lungs
Views: 32 Kelly orator
Campbell Biology / Figure Walkthrough Video / The structure and function of fish gills
 
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Urry/Cain/Wasserman/Minorsky/Reece - Campbell Biology, 11/e MasteringBiology Figure Walkthroughs guide students through key figures with narrated explanations, figure markups, and questions that reinforce important points.
Views: 133127 Pearson Higher Education
Alveolus
 
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Alveoli are thin air sacs where the exchange of gases takes place. The capillaries come so near to the air ducts that the gases from the blood difuse into the air and vice versa. The carbon dioxide diffuses from the red cell bodies to the air we are breathing while oxygen more abundant in the air diffuses into the blood.
Views: 167 Tomaz Amon
PART-10 Respiratory System | Exchange of Gases | Internal & External Respiration | B. Pharm, GPAT
 
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In this video we are focusing on Respiratory System. In humans and other mammals, the anatomy of a typical respiratory system is the respiratory tract. The tract is divided into an upper and a lower respiratory tract. The upper tract includes the nose, nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx and the part of the larynx above the vocal folds. The lower tract includes the lower part of the larynx, the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and the alveoli. The branching airways of the lower tract are often described as the respiratory tree or tracheobronchial tree. The intervals between successive branch points along the various branches of "tree" are often referred to as branching "generations", of which there are, in the adult human about 23. The earlier generations (approximately generations 0–16), consisting of the trachea and the bronchi, as well as the larger bronchioles which simply act as air conduits, bringing air to the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts and alveoli (approximately generations 17–23), where gas exchange takes place. Bronchioles are defined as the small airways lacking any cartilagenous support. The first bronchi to branch from the trachea are the right and left main bronchi. Second only in diameter to the trachea (1.8 cm), these bronchi (1 -1.4 cm in diameter) enter the lungs at each hilum, where they branch into narrower secondary bronchi known as lobar bronchi, and these branch into narrower tertiary bronchi known as segmental bronchi. Further divisions of the segmental bronchi (1 to 6 mm in diameter) are known as 4th order, 5th order, and 6th order segmental bronchi, or grouped together as subsegmental bronchi. In this video we have covered Exchange of gases which includes Internal & External Respiration. In this channel currently we are trying to discuss and explain the whole syllabus of Human Anatomy and Physiology for B. Pharm First year. Share, Support, Subscribe!!! #bhushanscience #respiratorysystem #pulmonaryvolumes #lungcapacities
Views: 764 Bhushan Science
Travel of Air Through Respiratory System - Gas Exchange in the Lungs - Nose to Alveoli Pathway
 
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Gas Exchange - Delivery of Oxygen & Elimination of Carbon dioxide - Medical Animation Air first enters the body through the mouth or nose, quickly moves to the pharynx (throat), passes through the larynx (voice box), enters the trachea, which branches into a left and right bronchus within the lungs and further divides into smaller and smaller branches called bronchioles. The smallest bronchioles end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli, which inflate during inhalation, and deflate during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs. It occurs in the lungs between the alveoli and a network of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which are located in the walls of the alveoli. The walls of the alveoli actually share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory system and the bloodstream. Oxygen molecules attach to red blood cells, which travel back to the heart. At the same time, the carbon dioxide molecules in the alveoli are blown out of the body with the next exhalation.
Views: 48506 Science Art
Respiration in Plants - Roots, Stems and Leaves - Life Processes - (Biology Class 10)
 
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Visit our website www.arinjayacademy.com for Hindi,  Maths, How gaseous exchange takes place form Soil, roots, stem to the leaves Please visit the following links. Youtube Channel Link : - https://www.youtube.com/c/arinjayjainacademy Website Link: http://www.arinjayacademy.com Facebook Page:- https://www.facebook.com/arinjayacademy For more videos , Please Subscribe to our channel
Views: 6760 Arinjay Academy
What Happens When You Breathe? How The Lungs Work Animation - Respiratory System Gas Exchange  Video
 
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Breathing In (Inhalation) When you breathe in, or inhale, your diaphragm contracts (tightens) and moves downward. This increases the space in your chest cavity, into which your lungs expand. The intercostal muscles between your ribs also help enlarge the chest cavity. They contract to pull your rib cage both upward and outward when you inhale. As your lungs expand, air is sucked in through your nose or mouth. The air travels down your windpipe and into your lungs. After passing through your bronchial tubes, the air finally reaches and enters the alveoli (air sacs). Through the very thin walls of the alveoli, oxygen from the air passes to the surrounding capillaries (blood vessels). A red blood cell protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin) helps move oxygen from the air sacs to the blood. At the same time, carbon dioxide moves from the capillaries into the air sacs. The gas has traveled in the bloodstream from the right side of the heart through the pulmonary artery. Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs is carried through a network of capillaries to the pulmonary vein. This vein delivers the oxygen-rich blood to the left side of the heart. The left side of the heart pumps the blood to the rest of the body. There, the oxygen in the blood moves from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Breathing Out (Exhalation) When you breathe out, or exhale, your diaphragm relaxes and moves upward into the chest cavity. The intercostal muscles between the ribs also relax to reduce the space in the chest cavity. As the space in the chest cavity gets smaller, air rich in carbon dioxide is forced out of your lungs and windpipe, and then out of your nose or mouth. Breathing out requires no effort from your body unless you have a lung disease or are doing physical activity. When you're physically active, your abdominal muscles contract and push your diaphragm against your lungs even more than usual. This rapidly pushes air out of your lungs. How the Lungs and Respiratory System Work You usually don't even notice it, but twelve to twenty times per minute, day after day, you breathe -- thanks to your body's respiratory system. Your lungs expand and contract, supplying life-sustaining oxygen to your body and removing from it, a waste product called carbon dioxide. The Act of Breathing Breathing starts at the nose and mouth. You inhale air into your nose or mouth, and it travels down the back of your throat and into your windpipe, or trachea. Your trachea then divides into air passages called bronchial tubes. For your lungs to perform their best, these airways need to be open during inhalation and exhalation and free from inflammation or swelling and excess or abnormal amounts of mucus. The Lungs As the bronchial tubes pass through the lungs, they divide into smaller air passages called bronchioles. The bronchioles end in tiny balloon-like air sacs called alveoli. Your body has over 300 million alveoli. The alveoli are surrounded by a mesh of tiny blood vessels called capillaries. Here, oxygen from the inhaled air passes through the alveoli walls and into the blood. After absorbing oxygen, the blood leaves the lungs and is carried to your heart. Your heart then pumps it through your body to provide oxygen to the cells of your tissues and organs. As the cells use the oxygen, carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed into the blood. Your blood then carries the carbon dioxide back to your lungs, where it is removed from the body when you exhale. The Diaphragm's Role in Breathing Inhalation and exhalation are the processes by which the body brings in oxygen and expels carbon dioxide. The breathing process is aided by a large dome-shaped muscle under the lungs called the diaphragm. When you breathe in, the diaphragm contracts downward, creating a vacuum that causes a rush of fresh air into the lungs. The opposite occurs with exhalation, where the diaphragm relaxes upwards, pushing on the lungs, allowing them to deflate. Clearing the Air The respiratory system has built-in methods to prevent harmful substances in the air from entering the lungs. Respiratory System Hairs in your nose help filter out large particles. Microscopic hairs, called cilia, are found along your air passages and move in a sweeping motion to keep the air passages clean. But if harmful substances, such as cigarette smoke, are inhaled, the cilia stop functioning properly, causing health problems like bronchitis. Mucus produced by cells in the trachea and bronchial tubes keeps air passages moist and aids in stopping dust, bacteria and viruses, allergy-causing substances, and other substances from entering the lungs. Impurities that do reach the deeper parts of the lungs can often be moved up via mucous and coughed out or swallowed. In the lungs, oxygen and carbon dioxide (a waste product of body processes) are exchanged in the tiny air sacs (alveoli) at the end of the bronchial tubes.
Views: 180632 Science Art
PART-11 Respiratory System | Transport of Respiratory Gases  | B. Pharm, GPAT
 
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In this video we are focusing on Respiratory System. In humans and other mammals, the anatomy of a typical respiratory system is the respiratory tract. The tract is divided into an upper and a lower respiratory tract. The upper tract includes the nose, nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx and the part of the larynx above the vocal folds. The lower tract includes the lower part of the larynx, the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and the alveoli. The branching airways of the lower tract are often described as the respiratory tree or tracheobronchial tree. The intervals between successive branch points along the various branches of "tree" are often referred to as branching "generations", of which there are, in the adult human about 23. The earlier generations (approximately generations 0–16), consisting of the trachea and the bronchi, as well as the larger bronchioles which simply act as air conduits, bringing air to the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts and alveoli (approximately generations 17–23), where gas exchange takes place. Bronchioles are defined as the small airways lacking any cartilagenous support. The first bronchi to branch from the trachea are the right and left main bronchi. Second only in diameter to the trachea (1.8 cm), these bronchi (1 -1.4 cm in diameter) enter the lungs at each hilum, where they branch into narrower secondary bronchi known as lobar bronchi, and these branch into narrower tertiary bronchi known as segmental bronchi. Further divisions of the segmental bronchi (1 to 6 mm in diameter) are known as 4th order, 5th order, and 6th order segmental bronchi, or grouped together as subsegmental bronchi. In this video we have covered Exchange of gases which includes Internal & External Respiration. In this channel currently we are trying to discuss and explain the whole syllabus of Human Anatomy and Physiology for B. Pharm First year. Share, Support, Subscribe!!! #bhushanscience #respiratorysystem #pulmonaryvolumes #lungcapacities
Views: 812 Bhushan Science
Exchange of Gases in Tissues
 
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Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade : 10 Subject :Biology Lesson : Life process Topic: Exchange of Gases in Tissues Exchange of gases also occur between blood and tissues. O2 and CO2 are exchanged in these sites by simple diffusion mainly based on pressure/concentration gradient. Solubility of the gases as well as the thickness of the membranes involved in diffusion are also some important factors that can affect the rate of diffusion Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Views: 4787 CBSE
How Do Plants Perform Gas Exchange?
 
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Plant life gas exchange in plants. The gases diffuse into the intercellular spaces of leaf through pores, which are normally on underside stomata exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide in (as well as loss water vapor transpiration) occurs pores called (singular stoma). Plant physiology biology questions and answers. Oxygen and water vapor leave the plant while carbon dioxide enters through pores called S cool, revision websites website. Meritnation gas exchange in plants youtuberespiration funscience explain the process of. Here's a video which explains nicely how fish carry out gas exchange what two things do plants and animals both require? Oxygen carbon dioxide does diffusion (gas exchange) depends on? 1surface the process of gaseous in happens leaves. How does the exchange of gases take place in plants. The leaves and young stems of plants have openings in the epidermis why do need to exchange gases with environment? Cellular respiration, also obtain carbon dioxide carry out photosynthesis especially adapted enable efficient gas exchange, yet at same time large air spaces leaf other parts plant can gain some oxygen overall, it is plant's advantage maximize sunlight trapping surface while keeping thickness a minimum so that only way we achieve through our lungs which provide area this important when talking about insects. Photosynthesis can be considered as the opposite or reverse to respiration in green plants. Normally stomata open when the light strikes leaf in morning and close during night plants respire all time, but photosynthesis only happens day. S cool, the revision website gas exchange in plants. This means that the net gas exchange from a leaf depends on light intensity in plants is required for two critical processes. S cool, the revision websites website. Gas exchange in plants physics & maths tutorgas the a level biologist your hubwhere does gas take place plants? . Exchange of gases in plants biology discussion. Thus gas exchange occurs as a result of respiration, when carbon dioxide is excreted that obtain their oxygen from water can maintain only low metabolic rate. Gas exchange in plants pass my exams easy exam revision notes chemistry for biologists gas. Gas exchange in plants is dominated by the roles of carbon dioxide, and when a plant actively photosynthesising light, it will be taking xerophytes perform almost all their gas at night, because unlike animals, have no specialized organs for (with each part such as leaves, stems roots own respiration single celled organisms protists do not organ must rely on direct gases woody photosynthesis and, like leaves best answer can occur several ways most. Bbc bitesize gcse biology gas exchange in plants revision 1. Uk a level gas exchange in plants class "" url? Q webcache. Gas exchange in plants kimball's biology pages. They do so by taking in oxygen from the air spaces present soil. This oxygen enters 8 feb 2013. S cool, the revision website s cool. They require oxygen for respir
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GASEOUS exchange in AMPHIBIANS
 
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Frog Respiration. The frog has three respiratory surfaces on its body that it uses to exchange gas with the surroundings: the skin, in the lungs and on the lining of the mouth. While completely submerged all of the frog's repiration takes place through the skin.
Views: 1208 mugabi joshua
PART-6 Respiratory System | Structure (Anatomy) of Lungs | B. Pharm, GPAT
 
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In this video we are focusing on Respiratory System. In humans and other mammals, the anatomy of a typical respiratory system is the respiratory tract. The tract is divided into an upper and a lower respiratory tract. The upper tract includes the nose, nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx and the part of the larynx above the vocal folds. The lower tract includes the lower part of the larynx, the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and the alveoli. The branching airways of the lower tract are often described as the respiratory tree or tracheobronchial tree. The intervals between successive branch points along the various branches of "tree" are often referred to as branching "generations", of which there are, in the adult human about 23. The earlier generations (approximately generations 0–16), consisting of the trachea and the bronchi, as well as the larger bronchioles which simply act as air conduits, bringing air to the respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts and alveoli (approximately generations 17–23), where gas exchange takes place. Bronchioles are defined as the small airways lacking any cartilagenous support. The first bronchi to branch from the trachea are the right and left main bronchi. Second only in diameter to the trachea (1.8 cm), these bronchi (1 -1.4 cm in diameter) enter the lungs at each hilum, where they branch into narrower secondary bronchi known as lobar bronchi, and these branch into narrower tertiary bronchi known as segmental bronchi. Further divisions of the segmental bronchi (1 to 6 mm in diameter) are known as 4th order, 5th order, and 6th order segmental bronchi, or grouped together as subsegmental bronchi. In this channel currently we are trying to discuss and explain the whole syllabus of Human Anatomy and Physiology for B. Pharm First year. Share, Support, Subscribe!!! #bhushanscience #respiratorysystem #lunganatomy
Views: 1430 Bhushan Science
Gas exchange in the lungs
 
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This video describes how the lungs are adapted to increase the rate of diffusion during gas exchange
Views: 42 Ciaran McDonnell
NEET / AIIMS 2019 - Human Physiology: Breathing & Respiration Lecture - 5
 
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1. How carbon dioxide comes into respiration? 2. How Carbon dioxide transported in blood? 3. What is chloride shift? 4. What is Haldane effect? 5. How Hb plays important role as Buffer & carrier? 6. Why Carbonic anhydrase is an important enzyme? Why it is present inside RBC? 7. Why Chloride & bicarbonate antiport takes place?
MECHANISM OF BREATHING PART 01
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. BREATHING AND EXCHANGE OF GASES:MECHANISM OF BREATHING:-Respiration occurs in 2 stages. 1 Inspiration: during which atmospheric air is drawn in and 2 Expiration: in which the alveolar air is released out The movement of air into and out of the lungs is carried out by creating a pressure gradient between the lungs and the atmosphere. When the air pressure within the alveolar spaces falls below atmospheric pressure, air enters the lungs, resulting in inspiration there is a negative pressure in the lungs with respect to atmospheric pressure, provided the larynx is open. Similarly expiration takes place when the air pressure within the alveoli exceeds atmospheric pressure; air is blown from the lungs. The flow of air is rapid or slow in proportion to the magnitude of the pressure difference because atmospheric pressure remains relatively constant, flow is determined by how much above or below atmospheric pressure, the pressure within the lungs rises or falls. Alveolar fluctuations are caused by expansion and contraction of lungs resulting from tensing and relaxing of the muscles internal intercostals muscles between ribs diaphragm. Inspiration is initiated by the contraction of diaphragm which increases the volume of thoracic chamber in the antero -- posterior axis the contraction of external intercostals muscles lifts up the ribs and sternum causing an increase in the volume of thoracic chamber in the dorso ventral axis.
Views: 176007 7activestudio
Capillaries | Biology | Anatomy
 
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To purchase this DVD please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program Respiration and Circulation, Gas Exchange, Molecular Transport. DVD Description Our Respiration Circulation DVD looks at the flow of air through the conducting portions of the respiratory system to the alveoli before examing: the role of hemoglobin in gas exchange and O2 and CO2 transport in the blood; the operation of the respiratory control center; and the mechanics of breathing. The program then investigates the composition of blood and how it flows through the heart, arteries, capillaries and veins before looking at the role of the lymphatic system in fighting infection, transporting fats, and returning interstitial fluid to the blood.
Views: 433374 greatpacificmedia
Mechanism of breathing
 
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In this video we explained about human respiratory system. Mechanism of breathing varies among the different group of animals depending mainly on their habits and level of organization. Today we will discuss on Mechanism of breathing. In this video you will come to know how our breathing mechanism work, our lungs absorb oxygen from the air and mix in blood and exhale co2 from the blood? This topic is very use-full for 10+1,10+2 and NEET student. Mechanism of breathing....breathing involves two stages: inspiration during which atmospheric air is drawn in and expiration by which the alveolar air is released out. The movement of air into the out of the lungs is carried out by creating a pressure gradient between the lungs and the atmospheric. Inspiration can occur if the pressure within the lungs and the atmosphere. Inspiration can occur if the pressure within the lungs (intra-pulmonary pressure) is less than the atmospheric pressure i.e. There is a negative pressure in the lungs with respect to the atmospheric pressure. Similarly expiration takes place when the intra-pulmonary pressure is higher than the atmospheric pressure. The diaphragm and a specialised set of muscles _ external and internal intercostals between the ribs helps in generation of such gradients. Exchange of gases Alveoli are the primary sites of Exchange of gases.Exchange of gases also occur between blood and tissue.O2 and Co2 are exchanged In these sites by simply diffusion of gases mainly based on pressure/ concentration gradient. Solubility of the gases as well as as the thicker of the membrane involve in diffusion are also some important factor that can affect the rate of diffusion. Pressure contribute by an individual gas in a mixture of gases is called partial pressure and its represented as pO2 for oxygen and pCO2 for carbon dioxide. Partial pressure of these two gases in the atmospheric air and the two sites of diffusion . similarly a gradient is present for Co2 in the opposite direction I.e. from tissue to blood to Alveoli. As the solubility of Co2 is 20-25 times higher than that o2 the amount of Co2 that can diffuse through the diffusion membrane per unit difference in partial pressure is much higher compared to that o2. there for all the factor in our body are favourable for diffusion of o2 from Alveoli to tissue and that of Co2 from tissue to Alveoli. .
Views: 1360 Online tuition centre
श्वसन– Respiration in Plants – Gaseous exchange -  in Hindi
 
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This Hindi video discusses about respiration in plants. It explains how gaseous exchange take place in plants. It is mapped to class 10 biology chapter – Life Processes (Respiration) About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.bodhaguru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.bodhaguru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/Bodhaguru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 8589 Bodhaguru
Breathing and Exchange of Gases for NEET | Part -6 | Gaseous Exchange
 
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Gaseous Exchange: Gas exchange is the biological process by which gases move passively by diffusion across a surface Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs and out of the body. Gaseous exchange at the level of tissue also takes place with the help of pressure gradient. ............................................................................. Subscribe to NEET preparation channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVjG... Like us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?... Follow us our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/neetwithaks/ Follow me on gmail ID: [email protected] Category: Education License: Standard YouTube License
Views: 1225 MEDICAL WORLD
Gas Exchange in Bony Fish  | A-level Biology | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
 
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Gas Exchange in Bony Fish in a Snap! Unlock the full A-level Biology course at http://bit.ly/2Z7K826 created by Adam Tildesley, Biology expert at SnapRevise and graduate of Cambridge University. The key points covered of this video include: 1. Structure of the Gills 2. Buccal Pumping 3. Countercurrent Flow Structure of the Gills Fish need to perform gas exchange like all other animals except they must do this whilst underwater. Fish are active and can grow quite large so they evolved gills to exchange gasses efficiently. The gills consist of a series of bony gill arches each with two stacks of gill filaments. Gill filaments have protruding rows of very thin lamellae. Each lamellae consists of a network of capillaries covered by a single layer of epithelial cells. Because the gill structures are delicate they are protected by a bony plate called an operculum. Buccal Pumping Mammalian lungs ventilate through the processes of inspiration and expiration. Fish also need to ventilate their gills to maintain a strong diffusion gradient for efficient exchange. To ventilate their gills fish coordinate opening of the opercular vents with closing of their buccal cavity. The buccal cavity is the technical term for a fish’s mouth. When the fish open their buccal cavity they close their opercular vents to draw freshwater in which can then be pumped over the gills again. Some sharks don’t use this mechanism and so have to swim constantly to keep a fresh supply of water flowing over their gills. Countercurrent Flow The orientation of the gill filaments and lamellae ensures that the water flowing over them moves countercurrent to the flow of blood through the capillaries. Countercurrent flow is a term that describes two liquids in close proximity to each other flowing in opposite directions. The process of counter-current flow ensures maximum efficiency of gas exchange at the gills. As water flows past the capillary it loses oxygen to the blood down a diffusion gradient. Blood that has very little oxygen flows past water with some oxygen and diffusion occurs. Blood that’s partially saturated with oxygen flows past water loaded with oxygen so diffusion can still take place. Parallel flow would result in both media containing equal amounts of oxygen as regular diffusion would occur which is less effective. Summary Fish require an efficient gas exchange organ that can work underwater The gills are a specialised organ designed to perform this process The gills consist of bony arches with rows of gill filaments containing lamellae The orientation of the gill structures allow for countercurrent flow of water and blood Countercurrent flow increases the efficiency of gas exchange in the gills Buccal pumping allows fish to ventilate their operculum thus maintaining a strong diffusion gradient around their gills
Views: 600 SnapRevise
Zoology 11th std-Chp:-13 HUMAN RESPIRATION.Part 4:-Transport of Gases
 
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The respiratory system is involved in the intake and exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between an organism and the environment. In air-breathing vertebrates like human beings, respiration takes place in the respiratory organs called lungs. . . . I will teach you whole 11th std zoology part. i had started from 11th std,I will teach you more about zoology slowly slowly... . . For any query/question in video or zoology part ask me freely in comments or mail me at... [email protected] I will answer all of your question . . Hope you like my video... Please Like,Share and Subscribe and subscribe to my channel. Zool Tricks THANK YOU....
Views: 155 Zool Tricks
Fish breathing
 
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Views: 433993 asdewqzxcde
Transport of Respiratory Gases | શ્વસન વાયુંઓંનું વહન | Breathing and Exchange of Gases
 
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Transport of Respiratory Gases શ્વસન વાયુંઓંનું વહન 12th science biology Breathing and Exchange of Gases Follow US: https://www.instagram.com/earthedutech/ http://earthedutech.com/ https://www.facebook.com/EarthEdutech/ https://twitter.com/EdutechEarth/ #Like, #Share, #Subscribe.... Oxygen is mainly transported as Oxyhemoglobin. Carbondioxide is transported through plasma as well as RBC. It is trasnported as carbonic acid, bicarbonates and carbamino haemoglobin. Exchange of gases takes place at pulmonary level and tissue level. Respiratory gases diffuse from their higher partial pressure to their lower partial pressure.
Views: 13 Earth Edutech