Home
Search results “Economic monopoly articles”
Microeconomics Practice Problem - Monopoly, Consumer Surplus, and Deadweight Loss
 
19:11
This video explains how to find the profit-maximizing quantity and price for a monopoly on a graph and how to identify consumer surplus and deadweight loss for a monopoly. The problem is taken from Economics by Dean Karlan and Jonathan Morduch, and is Ch. 14 problem #8. See the "Practice Problems" playlist for an archive of daily practice problems. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 37600 jodiecongirl
What is MONOPOLY? What does MONOPOLY mean? MONOPOLY meaning, definition & explanation
 
03:02
What is MONOPOLY? What does MONOPOLY mean? MONOPOLY meaning - MONOPOLY pronunciation -MONOPOLY definition - MONOPOLY explanation - How to pronounce MONOPOLY? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A monopoly exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity (this contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few entities dominating an industry). Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the firm's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit. The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller. In law, a monopoly is a business entity that has significant market power, that is, the power to charge overly high prices. Although monopolies may be big businesses, size is not a characteristic of a monopoly. A small business may still have the power to raise prices in a small industry (or market). A monopoly is distinguished from a monopsony, in which there is only one buyer of a product or service; a monopoly may also have monopsony control of a sector of a market. Likewise, a monopoly should be distinguished from a cartel (a form of oligopoly), in which several providers act together to coordinate services, prices or sale of goods. Monopolies, monopsonies and oligopolies are all situations such that one or a few of the entities have market power and therefore interact with their customers (monopoly), suppliers (monopsony) and the other companies (oligopoly) in ways that leave market interactions distorted. Monopolies can be established by a government, form naturally, or form by integration. In many jurisdictions, competition laws restrict monopolies. Holding a dominant position or a monopoly of a market is often not illegal in itself, however certain categories of behavior can be considered abusive and therefore incur legal sanctions when business is dominant. A government-granted monopoly or legal monopoly, by contrast, is sanctioned by the state, often to provide an incentive to invest in a risky venture or enrich a domestic interest group. Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are sometimes used as examples of government-granted monopolies. The government may also reserve the venture for itself, thus forming a government monopoly.
Views: 4955 The Audiopedia
What is GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY? What does GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY mean?
 
05:32
What is GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY? What does GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY mean? GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY meaning - GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY definition - GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In economics, a government-granted monopoly (also called a "de jure monopoly") is a form of coercive monopoly by which a government grants exclusive privilege to a private individual or firm to be the sole provider of a good or service; potential competitors are excluded from the market by law, regulation, or other mechanisms of government enforcement. As a form of coercive monopoly, government-granted monopoly is contrasted with a non-coercive monopoly or an efficiency monopoly, where there is no competition but it is not forcibly excluded. Amongst forms of coercive monopoly it is distinguished from government monopoly or state monopoly (in which government agencies hold the legally enforced monopoly rather than private individuals or firms) and from government-sponsored cartels (in which the government forces several independent producers to partially coordinate their decisions through a centralized organization). Advocates for government-granted monopolies often claim that they ensure a degree of public control over essential industries, without having those industries actually run by the state. Opponents often criticize them as political favors to corporations. Government-granted monopolies may be opposed by those who would prefer free markets as well as by those who would prefer to replace private corporations with public ownership. Under mercantilist economic systems, European governments with colonial interests often granted large and extremely lucrative monopolies to companies trading in particular regions, such as the Dutch East India Company. Today, government-granted monopolies may be found in public utility services such as public roads, mail, water supply, and electric power, as well as certain specialized and highly regulated fields such as education and gambling. In many countries lucrative natural resources industries, especially the petroleum industry, are controlled by government-granted monopolies. Franchises granted by governments to operate public transit through public roads are another example. A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state or national government to an inventor or his/her assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for a public disclosure of an invention. The procedure for granting patents, the requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a patent application must include one or more claims defining the invention which must be new, inventive, and useful or industrially applicable. In many countries, certain subject areas are excluded from patents, such as business methods and mental acts. The exclusive right granted to a patentee in most countries is the right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or distributing the patented invention without permission. Copyright is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution. This is usually only for a limited time. The exclusive rights are not absolute but limited by limitations and exceptions to copyright law, including fair use. A major limitation on copyright is that copyright protects only the original expression of ideas, and not the underlying ideas themselves. A trademark or trade mark is a distinctive sign or indicator used by an individual, business organization, or other legal entity to identify that the products or services to consumers with which the trademark appears originate from a unique source, and to distinguish its products or services from those of other entities. Trademarks can act as a form of consumer protection that lowers the transaction costs between a buyer and seller who are not personally acquainted.....
Views: 251 The Audiopedia
The Lerner Index
 
12:22
This video introduces the concept of the Lerner Index and discusses the relationship between price elasticity of demand and the markup of price over marginal cost. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 26631 jodiecongirl
The Amazon monopoly and the problem with Jeff Bezos' business model
 
12:38
Amazon is a monopoly in dozens of different markets because Jeff Bezos wants it to. In this criticism of Amazon, we analyze of Jeff Bezos business model threatens the very existence of free market. If you like to protect yourself on the web and want to support my channel, sign up for NordVPN at https://nordvpn.org/thehatedone or use my coupon code 'thehatedone' at the checkout to save 75% on the 3-year plan! Amazon is the second biggest corporation in the world and one of the only two companies to pass the $1 trillion mark. But during more than two decades of existence, Amazon has struggled to make any profit. It has everything to do with the business model of Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon. In his own words, Bezos believes in shareholder supremacy, which means everything is justified as long as the share value is growing. Jeff Bezos pushed Amazon great lengths to claim this dominance. From undercutting competitors with predatory pricing, through forcing itself into their business, to vertically integrating into strategic markets across the business line, Amazon is on track to gradually take over every aspect of e-commerce and to control and decide what we shop and what is allowed to be sold. Sources Amazon profits and revenue chart https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazon-reports-surge-in-profit-1461874333 and http://www.thestreet.com/story/875924/1/amazon-losses-widen-but-shares-rise-after-hours.html Amazon earnings https://venturebeat.com/2019/01/31/amazon-earnings-q4-2018/ and https://www.macrotrends.net/stocks/charts/AMZN/amazon/revenue Amazon Prime and stocks https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2010-11-24/whats-in-amazons-box-instant-gratification Amazon e-commerce share https://techcrunch.com/2018/07/13/amazons-share-of-the-us-e-commerce-market-is-now-49-or-5-of-all-retail-spend/ Amazon Web Services statistics https://www.statista.com/topics/4418/amazon-web-services/ Jeff Bezos net worth https://www.forbes.com/profile/jeff-bezos/ More than 90% market share in 5 products https://marketingland.com/amazon-owns-more-than-90-market-share-across-5-different-product-categories-report-241135 Amazon vs Quidsi and Diapers https://slate.com/technology/2013/10/amazon-book-how-jeff-bezos-went-thermonuclear-on-diapers-com.html? Amazon cloud https://www.reuters.com/article/amazon-cloud-idUSN1E7A727Q20111109 Amazon Tax https://www.businessinsider.in/Billionaire-VC%20-says-that-most-companies-will-eventually-pay-an-Amazon-tax/articleshow/50662558.cms Amazon Antitrust https://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/13/business/economy/antitrust-competition-inequality.html Amazon tightens grip on technology https://www.wsj.com/amp/articles/amazon-microsoft-tighten-grip-on-enterprise-tech-11552949379 https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazon-alphabet-and-walmart-were-top-it-spenders-in-2018-11547754757?mod=article_inline https://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/06/magazine/06fob-q4-t.html https://www.skyhighnetworks.com/cloud-security-blog/microsoft-azure-closes-iaas-adoption-gap-with-amazon-aws/ A major essay on Amazon anti-competitive practices and monopolization: Amazon antitrust paradox https://www.yalelawjournal.org/note/amazons-antitrust-paradox Credits: CO.AG Music https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Bitcoin: 1C7UkndgpQqjTrUkk8pY1rRpmddwHaEEuf Dash Xm4Mc5gXhcpWXKN84c7YRD4GSb1fpKFmrc Litecoin LMhiVJdFhYPejMPJE7r9ooP3nm3DrX4eBT Ethereum 0x6F8bb890E122B9914989D861444Fa492B8520575 Follow me: https://twitter.com/The_HatedOne_ https://www.bitchute.com/TheHatedOne/ https://www.reddit.com/r/thehatedone/ https://www.minds.com/The_HatedOne The footage and images featured in the video were for critical analysis, commentary and parody, which are protected under the Fair Use laws of the United States Copyright act of 1976.
Views: 487669 The Hated One
Monopoly and Competition (by Murray N. Rothbard)
 
55:47
More on monopoly and competition: http://vforvoluntary.com/library/1/econ/articles-videos/11/monopoly-and-competition Presented in 1986 at New York Polytechnic University. Recorded by Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Audio taken from: http://mises.org/media/4603/ (many coughs removed) LUDWIG VON MISES INSTITUTE - CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION 3.0 -- http://www.reddit.com/r/austrian_economics/
Office Hours: Calculating Monopoly Profit
 
05:49
In our video on Maximizing Profit Under Monopoly, we cover how firms can use their market power to raise the price of a good well beyond its marginal cost. A practice question from the Microeconomics final exam asked you to find the total profit of a monopolist under certain conditions. In this Office Hours session, Mary Clare Peate, Marginal Revolution University’s Instructional Designer, helps you solve that problem. Vote on a topic for our next Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/1psatWs Additional practice questions: http://bit.ly/1nM7ciO Maximizing Profit Under Monopoly: http://bit.ly/22i0nbT Principles of Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/ICs6/
Profit Maximization
 
22:28
This video shows how to maximize profit, and it derives the condition under which profit is maximized. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 260381 jodiecongirl
What Is A Monopoly In Economics?
 
00:45
Monopoly market structure meaning, features and typeseconomic board games monopoly real life economics. There are no close substitutes for the commodity it produces a pure monopoly is single supplier in market. A monopoly is an economic market structure where a specific person or enterprise the 16 jun 2016 name of both undesirable situation and one most popular board games around worldMonopoly' times. What is monopoly market? Definition, meaning and features the concise encyclopedia of economics. What is a monopoly? An economic definition youtube. Definition of 'monopoly' the economic timeswhat is a monopoly in economics? & impact on what monopoly? and meaning businessdictionary. This is an updated revision presentation on the economics of monopoly power in markets 8 jan 2016 topic 3. Characteristics features of monopoly learn more about defining in the boundless open textbook. Definition of 'monopoly' definition a market structure characterized by single seller, selling unique product in the. Students should be able to understand the monopoly power in markets close a pure but 16 jul 2012 microeconomicsmonopoly microeconomics nilormi dasmarket structuresin economics nov 2010 market structure meaning, features and types, article posted by label. In a monopoly market, the seller faces no competition, as he is sole of goods with close substitute monopolies can be considered extreme result free market capitalism absent any restriction or restraints, single company group an enterprise becomes big enough to own all nearly (goods, supplies, commodities, infrastructure and assets) for particular type product service exists when specific person only supplier commodity 16 mar 2015 in this lesson, you will learn about monopolistic markets what means producers consumers. A monopoly is an enterprise that the only seller of a good or service. Library of monopoly market structure basics (video) tutor2u economicsmonopoly in microeconomics slideshare. Googleusercontent search. After this lesson, you will both monopoly and oligopoly refer to a specific type of economic market structure, but understanding the differences implications two can be difficult in way, refers situation which there is only one seller commodity. For the purposes of regulation, monopoly power exists when a single firm controls 25the market is characterized by seller, selling unique product with restriction these economic barriers restrict entry new firms in uk said to have if it has more than 25. Monopoly' the economic times definition of 'monopoly' times economictimes diatimes monopoly url? Q webcache. Monopoly meaning, definitions, features and criticism economics monopoly online. In the absence of government intervention, a monopoly is free to set any price it chooses in market structure when there only firm prevailing particular since single seller leads economics scale 24 jan 2012. Monopoly' the economic times.
Views: 70 new sparky
The Grand Theory of Amazon
 
10:31
Join Dollar Shave Club for only $5 http://www.dollarshaveclub.com/polymatter Thanks to sponsor Dollar Shave Club, new members get their 1st month of the Daily Essentials Starter Set including trial-sized versions of their Body Cleanser, One Wipe Charlies’ Butt Wipes, and Shave Butter along with their Executive Razor for only $5 with free shipping. Patreon: https://patreon.com/polymatter Twitter: https://twitter.com/polymatters Reddit: https://reddit.com/r/PolyMatter Discord: https://discord.gg/polymatter Amazon sells everything from streaming video to organic grapes, and it’s all part of a large (likely successful) strategy to dominate the entire consumer market. *The end of this video includes a paid sponsored promotion. This company had no part in the writing, editing, or production of the rest of the video. Credits Music is by Varsity Star: https://varsitystar.bandcamp.com/releases and the Varsity Star Facebook is https://www.facebook.com/varsitystarmusic/ The biggest source of inspiration for this video is the wonderful Ben Thompson's analysis of Amazon at https://stratechery.com - highly recommended. “wasted” GTA font used under a free license: https://www.dafont.com/pricedown.font SEC report from Amazon, including its competitors: https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1018724/000101872416000172/amzn-20151231x10k.htm https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2016/12/29/amazons-patent-flying-warehouse/95951942/ http://money.cnn.com/2017/02/28/technology/amazon-web-services-outages/index.html http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/23/technology/amazon-education-tenmarks-writing/index.html https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/02/28/amazons-cloud-service-goes-down-sites-scramble/98530914/ https://www.tomshardware.com/news/Amazon-Kindle-Cost-Production-Supplies-Parts,13953.html https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/16/technology/moviepass-economy-startups.html http://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-prime-member-numbers-revealed-2018-4 https://www.cbinsights.com/research/report/amazon-strategy-teardown/ https://a16z.com/2014/09/05/why-amazon-has-no-profits-and-why-it-works/ https://techcrunch.com/2017/05/14/why-amazon-is-eating-the-world/ https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/03/01/amazon-control-internet-aws-cloud-services-outage/98548762/ https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2017/11/13/to-what-extent-are-amazon-and-google-competitors/#773520114267 https://searchengineland.com/survey-amazon-beats-google-starting-point-product-search-252980 https://www.economist.com/briefing/2017/03/25/are-investors-too-optimistic-about-amazon https://www.economist.com/leaders/2017/03/25/amazon-the-worlds-most-remarkable-firm-is-just-getting-started https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/24/amazon-pharmacy-team-expanded-to-more-than-30-leerink.html https://stratechery.com/2018/amazons-go-and-the-future/ https://stratechery.com/2016/the-amazon-tax/ https://stratechery.com/2018/amazon-health/ https://stratechery.com/2014/losing-amazon-religion/ https://stratechery.com/2013/amazons-dominant-strategy/ https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/197608 https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/16/technology/moviepass-economy-startups.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazons-newest-ambitioncompeting-directly-with-ups-and-fedex-1474994758 https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/031116/making-sense-amazons-move-logistics-amzn.asp https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/020515/why-amazon-needs-dump-ups-and-fedex-amzn-fdx-ups.asp https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LT3L7AO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00LT3L7AO&linkCode=as2&tag=sgtsnu-20&linkId=YN4RE2ODX35ZZBNQ http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/amazon-stock-price-here-are-the-4-industries-wall-street-thinks-amazon-will-destroy-the-fastest-2017-9-1002426699 https://venturebeat.com/2017/07/17/amazon-tanks-blue-aprons-stock-with-one-trademark-filing/ https://www.greenwichtime.com/technology/businessinsider/article/Blue-Apron-got-Amazoned-before-it-even-became-a-11255872.php https://www.investopedia.com/news/amazon-launches-amazon-cash-amzn-wmt/ https://www.fastcompany.com/3038252/the-economist-trades-in-henry-kissinger-for-googles-eric-schmidt https://www.investopedia.com/articles/company-insights/092016/7-worst-products-amazon-ever-had-amzn.asp http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-24/amazon-revenue-tops-estimates-before-holiday-quarter.html https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/20/opinion/how-amazon-took-seattles-soul.html https://thenextweb.com/mobile/2011/09/28/amazons-bezos-we-worked-hard-to-charge-you-less-for-kindle-fire/ https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazon-welcomes-teens-with-new-parent-controlled-shopping-allowance-1507726803 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-05-10/amazon-is-said-to-halt-google-shopping-ads-as-rivalry-heats-up https://stratechery.com/2018/divine-discontent-disruptions-antidote/ http://fortune.com/longform/amazon-groceries-fortune-500/
Views: 1516270 PolyMatter
Microeconomics Practice Problem - The Impact of a Cost Increase on a Monopoly
 
16:32
This video shows how to analyze the impact of an increase in marginal cost on the production decisions and profit for a monopolist. The problem is taken from Principles of Microeconomics by Dirk Mateer and Lee Coppock, and is Ch. 10 problem #10. See the "Practice Problems" playlist for an archive of daily practice problems. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 4208 jodiecongirl
What is BILATERAL MONOPOLY? What does BILATERAL MONOPOLY mean? BILATERAL MONOPOLY meaning
 
02:03
What is BILATERAL MONOPOLY? What does BILATERAL MONOPOLY mean? BILATERAL MONOPOLY meaning - BILATERAL MONOPOLY definition - BILATERAL MONOPOLY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A bilateral monopoly is a market structure consisting of both a monopoly (a single seller) and a monopsony (a single buyer). Bilateral monopoly situations are typically analyzed using the theory of Nash bargaining games, and market price and output will be determined by forces like bargaining power of both buyer and seller, with a final price settling in between the two sides's points of maximum profit. A bilateral monopoly model is often used in situations where the switching costs of both sides are prohibitively high. An example of a bilateral monopoly would be when a labor union (a monopolist in the supply of labor) faces a single large employer in a factory town (a monopsonist). A peculiar example exists in the market for nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in the United States, where the buyer (the United States Navy) is the only one demanding the product, and there is only one seller (Huntington Ingalls Industries) by stipulation of the regulations promulgated by the buyer's parent organization (the United States Department of Defense, which has thus far not licensed any other firm to manufacture, overhaul, or decommission nuclear-powered aircraft carriers). A typical or showpiece example of bilateral monopoly is a lignite (brown coal ) mine and a lignite based power station. Since transport of lignite is not economic, the power station is located close to the mine. The mine is monopolistic in producing lignite and as the only buyer the power station acts as a monopsonist.
Views: 2091 The Audiopedia
Monopoly | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:01:10
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Monopoly Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A monopoly (from Greek μόνος mónos ["alone" or "single"] and πωλεῖν pōleîn ["to sell"]) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity. This contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few sellers dominating a market. Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the seller's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit. The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller. In law, a monopoly is a business entity that has significant market power, that is, the power to charge overly high prices. Although monopolies may be big businesses, size is not a characteristic of a monopoly. A small business may still have the power to raise prices in a small industry (or market).A monopoly is distinguished from a monopsony, in which there is only one buyer of a product or service; a monopoly may also have monopsony control of a sector of a market. Likewise, a monopoly should be distinguished from a cartel (a form of oligopoly), in which several providers act together to coordinate services, prices or sale of goods. Monopolies, monopsonies and oligopolies are all situations in which one or a few entities have market power and therefore interact with their customers (monopoly or oligopoly), or suppliers (monopsony) in ways that distort the market.Monopolies can be established by a government, form naturally, or form by integration. In many jurisdictions, competition laws restrict monopolies. Holding a dominant position or a monopoly in a market is often not illegal in itself, however certain categories of behavior can be considered abusive and therefore incur legal sanctions when business is dominant. A government-granted monopoly or legal monopoly, by contrast, is sanctioned by the state, often to provide an incentive to invest in a risky venture or enrich a domestic interest group. Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are sometimes used as examples of government-granted monopolies. The government may also reserve the venture for itself, thus forming a government monopoly.Monopolies may be naturally occurring due to limited competition because the industry is resource intensive and requires substantial costs to operate.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts
The Monopoly Problem
 
08:53
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FilthyHeretic Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/A0A3F8ED Twitter: @FilthyHeretic FEE: Herbert Dow and Predatory Pricing https://fee.org/articles/herbert-dow-and-predatory-pricing/ Mises: The Myth of the Natural Monopoly https://mises.org/library/myth-natural-monopoly-0
Views: 949 Filthy Heretic
What is PUBLIC MONOPOLY? What does PUBLIC MONOPOLY mean? PUBLIC MONOPOLY meaning & explanation
 
02:26
What is PUBLIC MONOPOLY? What does PUBLIC MONOPOLY mean? PUBLIC MONOPOLY meaning - PUBLIC MONOPOLY definition - PUBLIC MONOPOLY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In economics, a government monopoly (or public monopoly) is a form of coercive monopoly in which a government agency or government corporation is the sole provider of a particular good or service and competition is prohibited by law. It is a monopoly created by the government. It is usually distinguished from a government-granted monopoly, where the government grants a monopoly to a private individual or company. A government monopoly may be run by any level of government - national, regional, local; for levels below the national, it is a local monopoly. The term state monopoly usually means a government monopoly run by the national government, although it may also refer to monopolies run by regional entities called "states" (notably the U.S. states). The most prominent example of a state monopoly is law and the legitimate use of physical force. In many countries, the postal system is run by the government with competition forbidden by law in some or all services. Also, government monopolies on public utilities, telecommunications and railroads have historically been common, though recent decades have seen a strong privatization trend throughout the industrialized world. In Scandinavian countries some goods deemed harmful are distributed through a government monopoly. For example, in Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, government-owned companies have monopolies for selling alcoholic beverages. Casinos and other institutions for gambling might also be monopolized. In Finland, the government has also a monopoly to operate slot machines. Governments often create or allow monopolies to exist and grant them patents. This limits entry and allow the patent-holding firm to earn a monopoly profit from an invention. Health care systems where the government controls the industry and specifically prohibits competition, such as in Canada, are government monopolies.
Views: 395 The Audiopedia
Bundling
 
15:29
Bundling refers to when two or more goods are sold together as a package. Microsoft Office, Cable TV, Lexis-Nexis, and Spotify all provide examples of bundling. What if there were no bundling and you had to pay for Cable TV by channel rather than purchasing channels in bundles? Would you end up paying more or less? We explore this question and others in this video. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1S1vhil Next video: http://bit.ly/1TG9Swb Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GZRb/
Monopoly Capital
 
06:53
Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Monopoly Capital: An Essay on the American Economic and Social Order is a book by Paul Sweezy and Paul A.Baran published in 1966 by Monthly Review Press.It made a major contribution to Marxian theory by shifting attention from the assumption of a competitive economy to the monopolistic economy associated with the giant corporations that dominate the modern accumulation process.Their work played a leading role in the intellectual development of the New Left in the 1960s and 1970s. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 656 WikiWikiup
Top 10 Interesting FACTS About the Board Game MONOPOLY
 
13:51
Monopoly was first produced in 1935 by Parker Brothers, and has been ruining friendships and tearing families apart ever since. Despite how frustrating the game is, it’s considered the world’s most popular and, as of 2009, over 250 million copies have been sold. →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/toptenznet?sub_confirmation=1 Help us translate our videos: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_queue?msg=10&tab=0 - Learn more why you might want to help: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6052538 Find more lists at: http://www.toptenz.net Entertaining and educational top 10 lists from TopTenzNet! Subscribe to our Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopTenz/ Business inquiries to [email protected] Other TopTenz Videos: Top 10 Most Amazing DIY Projects Ever https://youtu.be/uXp-rHLTxNQ?list=PLQ4d2-ByGhnL-cPEY5RatLLt_FtJKFkNC Top 10 Terrible and Sometimes DANGEROUS Internet CRAZES https://youtu.be/4xeK3FnhsGg?list=PLQ4d2-ByGhnKEdcdzaYO1HCwvMfQlhzSv Text version: http://www.toptenz.net/10-interesting-facts-board-game-monopoly.php Coming up: 10. Are You Playing the Game Correctly? 9. Three Most Landed on Spots include Illinois Avenue, GO, and B&O Railroad 8. The Characters 7. People Have Killed Each Other Over the Game 6. You Can Win a Game with 2-players in 21 seconds 5. Best Way to Win 4. The Real Creator was a Woman Who Didn’t Get Credit For Her Invention 3. The Unusual Story of Marvin Gardens 2. Monopoly was Rejected by Milton Bradley and Parker Brothers 1. Escape Maps Were Smuggled to British POWs during WWII Source/Further reading: http://www.criticalmiss.com/issue10/CampaignRealMonopoly1.html http://www.purplepawn.com/2014/03/monopoly-house-rules-to-gain-official-recognition/ http://www.tkcs-collins.com/truman/monopoly/monopoly.shtml http://www.monopolycity.com/ac_mrmonopoly.html http://www.weirduniverse.net/blog/comments/monopoly_killer https://youtu.be/gHJkTz6Ej3U http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2010/06/how_to_win_monopoly_in_21_seco.html http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-win-monopoly-reddit-post-2016-1 https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/business/behind-monopoly-an-inventor-who-didnt-pass-go.html?_r=0 https://web.archive.org/web/20131025200920id_/http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/monopoly/index.html https://books.google.ca/books?id=jftapGDTmYUC&lpg=PA51&dq=monopoly%2052%20fundamental%20errors&pg=PA52#v=onepage&q&f=false http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/monopolys-hidden-maps-wwii-pows-escape/story?id=8605905 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/Parker_brothers.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8149/7112758505_ae5dd8f526_z.jpg https://i.ytimg.com/vi/ge-ofzM_1cs/maxresdefault.jpg http://monopoly.cdbpdx.com/GB_PAF_1/tn-600_Mon_GB_PAF-1_Rules_Pg01.JPG https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/23/Family_playing_a_board_game_%282%29.jpg/1024px-Family_playing_a_board_game_%282%29.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3178/2638202771_aeb38046af_b.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8363/8266556840_c52a146dcc_b.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8404/8635617062_0b351943d7_b.jpg https://thumbnails-visually.netdna-ssl.com/monopoly-house-rules_5334d0d94d86d_w1500.jpg http://www.toptenz.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/monopoly4-640x427.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8199/8265484719_e73987e288_b.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/469/18560942769_f16c8df9ed_b.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51mjKGdGchL._SY450_.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51tlfGByhML.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4108/5180175268_198b009265_b.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/2/1583467_191d886988_b.jpg http://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/monopoly/images/d/df/Community-chest-rob-hans.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130215155807 https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514AQ7uQLlL._SY450_.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2502/4040179162_8f59d60bb6_b.jpg https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5631/22781744865_12823a048c_b.jpg
Views: 56279 TopTenz
Deriving Marginal Revenue From the Demand Curve
 
12:36
This video shows how to derive the marginal revenue curve from the demand curve. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 103847 jodiecongirl
Monopoly Without a Monopolist: An Economic Analysis of Bitcoin
 
01:01:34
Owned by nobody and controlled by an almost immutable protocol, the Bitcoin payment system is a platform with two main constituencies: users and profit-seeking miners who maintain the system's infrastructure. The paper seeks to understand the economics of the system: How does the system raise revenue to pay for its infrastructure? How are usage fees determined? How much infrastructure is deployed? What are the implications of changing parameters in the protocol? See more at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/monopoly-without-monopolist-economic-analysis-bitcoin/
Views: 1596 Microsoft Research
The Economics of Uber
 
09:42
First 500 people get 2 months free of Skillshare: http://skl.sh/polymatter7 Patreon: https://patreon.com/polymatter Twitter: https://twitter.com/polymatters Reddit: https://reddit.com/r/PolyMatter Discord: https://discord.gg/polymatter Uber may be the highest-valued private company in the world, but its economic troubles are profound and concerning. This includes a paid sponsored promotion which had no part in the writing, editing, or production of the rest of the video. Music by Varsity Star: https://varsitystar.bandcamp.com/releases their Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/varsitystarmusic/ Special thanks to http://ridester.com for looking over the script in advance. Ridester offers resources for ride share drivers. Brief music clip: Teddy Bear Waltz Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ VHS fast forward effect modified from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_auAhu-91U https://www.forbes.com/sites/lensherman/2017/12/14/why-cant-uber-make-money/#7d83f5f410ec Dr Seuss Style Font: “Yikes” by Rick Montgomery https://www.dafont.com/yikes.font?l[]=10&l[]=1 http://flopstarter.com https://medium.com/enrique-dans/why-is-uber-sweeping-all-before-it-because-it-understands-economies-of-scale-70d104688783 https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/independent-contractor-self-employed-or-employee http://ritholtz.com/2018/05/tlc-medallion-owners-created-uber/ https://www.caseyresearch.com/forget-stocks-buy-taxi-medallions/ https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/10/nyregion/new-york-taxi-medallions-uber.html http://www.nyc.gov/html/media/totweb/taxioftomorrow_history_regulationandprosperity.html https://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/11/nyregion/medallion-limits-stem-from-the-30-s.html https://www.theverge.com/2018/6/26/17500510/uber-london-license-appeal-court-decision?utm_campaign=theverge&utm_content=chorus&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter https://www.statista.com/statistics/277229/facebooks-annual-revenue-and-net-income/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/06/27/how-much-uber-drivers-actually-make-per-hour/?utm_term=.cc5e13967aec https://www.cbinsights.com/research-unicorn-companies https://expandedramblings.com/index.php/uber-statistics/ https://medium.com/uber-under-the-hood/uber-in-small-towns-and-cities-a-data-deep-dive-6e3cc2a250f4 https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-self-driving-cars-could-end-uber-1494154805 https://www.wsj.com/articles/with-kalanick-out-ubers-troubles-are-just-beginning-1498049054 https://www.wsj.com/articles/with-kalanick-out-ubers-troubles-are-just-beginning-1498049054 https://www.statista.com/chart/12059/uber-revenue-bookings-and-net-loss/ https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/mar/01/uber-lyft-driver-wages-median-report https://www.ridesharingdriver.com/uber-fees-cancellation-booking-cleaning-fees/
Views: 1176003 PolyMatter
Economy: Global Monopoly and Economic Collapse
 
01:01
TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW: http://apocalypse-how.com/2012/05/25/economy-global-monopoly-and-economic-collapse/ Well the Slow Motion Train wreck that is the Global economy is still ticking. Of course we have all been hearing that the global economy is collapsing http://apocalypse-how.com/
Views: 87 Apocalypsehow1
Why Those Who Feel They Have More Give Less
 
08:56
View more on this study at PBS NewsHour's Making Sense: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/economy/making-sense/ and http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/why-those-who-feel-they-have-less-give-more/ In a series of startling studies, psychologists at the University of California at Berkeley have found that "upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals." Ongoing research is trying to find out what it is about wealth — or lack of it — that makes people behave they way they do.
Views: 2007026 PBS NewsHour
Monopoly | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:15:05
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopoly 00:03:01 1 Market structures 00:05:27 2 Characteristics 00:06:30 3 Sources of monopoly power 00:10:59 4 Monopoly versus competitive markets 00:14:47 5 The inverse elasticity rule 00:14:59 5.1 Market power 00:15:08 6 Price discrimination 00:17:18 6.1 Example 00:19:36 6.2 Classifying customers 00:22:55 7 Monopoly and efficiency 00:24:15 7.1 Natural monopoly 00:26:11 7.2 Government-granted monopoly 00:37:20 8 Monopolist shutdown rule 00:38:30 9 Breaking up monopolies 00:38:49 10 Law 00:39:00 10.1 Establishing Dominance 00:39:47 10.1.1 Relevant Product Market 00:39:58 10.1.2 Relevant Geographic Market 00:42:10 10.1.3 Market shares 00:42:20 10.1.4 Other Related Factors 00:44:52 10.2 Types of Abuses 00:45:03 10.3 Examples of Abuses 00:45:44 11 Historical monopolies 00:45:55 11.1 Origin 00:46:35 11.2 Monopolies of resources 00:48:01 11.2.1 Salt 00:49:17 11.2.2 Coal 00:49:57 11.2.3 Petroleum 00:50:55 11.2.4 Steel 00:51:59 11.2.5 Diamonds 00:54:50 11.3 Utilities 00:56:27 11.4 Transportation 00:57:34 11.5 Foreign trade 00:58:20 11.6 Professional sports 00:58:31 11.7 Other examples of monopolies 00:59:15 12 Countering monopolies 00:59:25 13 See also 01:00:52 14 Notes and references 01:01:57 15 Further reading 01:03:11 16 External links 01:04:07 Diamonds 01:06:05 Utilities 01:07:59 Transportation 01:09:04 Foreign trade 01:09:55 Professional sports 01:10:27 Other examples of monopolies 01:11:55 Countering monopolies 01:13:59 See also 01:14:08 Notes and references 01:14:40 Further reading 01:14:49 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9046161722940934 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A monopoly (from Greek μόνος mónos ["alone" or "single"] and πωλεῖν pōleîn ["to sell"]) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity. This contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few sellers dominating a market. Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the seller's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit. The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller. In law, a monopoly is a business entity that has significant market power, that is, the power to charge overly high prices. Although monopolies may be big businesses, size is not a characteristic of a monopoly. A small business may still have the power to raise prices in a small industry (or market).A monopoly is distinguished from a monopsony, in which there is only one buyer of a product or service; a monopoly may also have monopsony control of a sector of a market. Likewise, a monopoly should be distinguished from a cartel (a form of oligopoly), in which several providers act together to coordinate services, prices or sale of goods. Monopolies, monopsonies and oligopolies are all situations in which one or a few entities have market power and therefore interact with their customers (monopoly or oligopoly), or suppliers (monopsony) in ways that distort the market.Monopolies can be established by a government, form naturally, or form by integration. In many jurisdictions, competition laws restrict monopolies. Holding a dominant position or a monopoly in a market is often not illegal in itself, however certain categories of behavior can be considered abusive and therefore incur legal sanctions when business is dominant. A government-granted monopoly or legal monopoly, by contrast, is sanctioned by the state, often to provide an incentive to invest in a risky venture or enrich a dom ...
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Monopolistic Competition: How to Graph it
 
13:05
A short video analyzing the market structure called "monopolistic competition" and showing how to analyze and graph a firm operating in this competitive environment
Views: 49293 Kyle Purpura
The TRUTH About The Patent Monopoly! - Owning An Idea By FORCE with Jeffrey Tucker
 
16:34
Josh Sigurdson talks with Jeffrey Tucker of the American Institute For Economic Research in Acapulco, Mexico about the monopoly on ideas that are patents as well as intellectual property. This is a subject matter that people need to better comprehend as Tesla once again releases its patents. As Jeffrey Tucker, in Tesla's case it's most likely just virtue that they're signalling as they depend on the adoption of electric vehicles, but the true story behind patent laws is a story of massive corporate monopolies restricting competition. At the advent of the patent office, people quickly begun restricting other people and companies from adapting their ideas and building them. This stifled technological advancement that in many ways could have helped people in the healthcare field as well as in basic market competition. The fact is, people should not be able to OWN ideas. It is the responsibility of the individual to be the BEST at developing an idea. Patent laws simply create massive monopolies that therefor cannot be competed against. While it works for some, it hurts the markets overall. The same goes for intellectual property. Sure, terms can be written in the case of intellectual property that people agree to at the purchase of an album, but you cannot steal what does not truly exist outside of frequency or pigmentation. You cannot take someone else's car and then leave a copy of the car behind and you should not be able to use government to restrict other people's ability to do just that. This is an issue of principle and consistency which Jeffrey Tucker is no stranger to. Tucker has stayed completely true to his belief in free markets and truly impressive competition without the use of force. What's better than individuals voting on the market for the best products with the best quality at the best price? Government simply stifles industry, creates monopolies and then comes in as the so-called hero with more restrictions that down the line create further monopolies. It's the Hegelian Dialectic we speak of so much here at WAM. We always appreciate hearing Jeffrey Tucker's thoughts and we urge everyone to follow him on Twitter at @JeffreyATucker as well as follow his articles at AIER! Stay tuned for more from WAM! Don't forget to check out Mike Maloney's GoldSilver at the following link: https://goldsilver.com/?aff=WAM Video edited by Josh Sigurdson Featuring: Jeffrey Tucker Josh Sigurdson Graphics by Bryan Foerster and Josh Sigurdson Visit us at www.WorldAlternativeMedia.com LIKE us on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/LibertyShallPrevail/ Follow us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/WorldAltMedia FIND US ON STEEMIT: https://steemit.com/@joshsigurdson BUY JOHN SNEISEN'S LATEST BOOK HERE: Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1988497051/ref=zg_bs_tab_pd_bsnr_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=ZBK6VTXQRA2F77RYZ602 Kindle https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B073V5R72H/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1500130568&sr=1-1 DONATE HERE: https://www.gofundme.com/w3e2es Help keep independent media alive! Pledge here! Just a dollar a month can help us stay on our feet as we face intense YouTube censorship! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2652072&ty=h&u=2652072 BITCOIN ADDRESS: 18d1WEnYYhBRgZVbeyLr6UfiJhrQygcgNU Buy Stefan Aarnio's NEW book 'Hard Times Create Strong Men' here: http://stefanaarnio.com/strongmenjosh CHECK OUT The Red Pill Expo 2019 here: https://redpillexpo.com/?rpe=wam World Alternative Media 2019 "Find the truth, be the change!"
The Theory of Monopoly Price: From Menger to Rothbard | Joseph T. Salerno (Lecture 4 of 10)
 
01:22:07
Professor Joseph T. Salerno presents the seminar "Austrian School of Economics: Revisionist History and Contemporary Theory," a series of ten formal lectures on topics related to the history and theory of the Austrian School of Economics. Recorded at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Auburn, Alabama; 6-10 June 2005. http://mises.org Playlist for complete lecture series: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?p=PLF1C02D82CD58960C * * * * * Joseph T. Salerno is an economist of the Austrian School who resides in the United States. A professor at Pace University, Salerno is an active scholar in the areas of banking and monetary theory, comparative economics, and the history of economic thought. He is a senior faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, for which he frequently lectures and writes, and he serves as editor of the Institute's Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. http://mises.org/fellow.aspx?id=17 http://mises.org/articles.aspx?AuthorId=237 http://mises.org/literature.aspx?action=author&Id=237 Links to selected online resources on Austrian Economics: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics https://tinyurl.com/yapklreq Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/ab8wx88 Man, Economy, and State: A Treatise on Economics http://tinyurl.com/y8zg569h Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/axhdzg3 The Austrian School of Economics: A History of Its Ideas, Ambassadors, and Institutions https://tinyurl.com/yagraqj3 Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/y9ajba8k Economic Thought Before Adam Smith: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Vol. I http://tinyurl.com/ngqzfup Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/a3obfgu Classical Economics: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Vol. II http://tinyurl.com/np6a898 Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/bd44b6s Theory and History: An Interpretation of Social and Economic Evolution https://tinyurl.com/q9kf6jq Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/aa7gyv2 Economic Science and the Austrian Method https://tinyurl.com/y8lgyzta Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/y2xytrbb The Austrian Theory of the Trade Cycle and Other Essays http://tinyurl.com/yaz8cblv Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/yy2gg4y9 Mises: The Last Knight of Liberalism http://tinyurl.com/y2skpf6h Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/ajaywkh A Primer on Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/33gupnk Historical Setting of the Austrian School of Economics https://tinyurl.com/ycaddq85 Mises and Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/yynktdde Philosophical and Ethical Implications of Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/yaxz4stm Ludwig von Mises and the Austrian School of Economics http://tinyurl.com/yavecrju Praxeology: The Methodology of Austrian Economics https://tinyurl.com/pf46rtk Misesian Praxeology https://tinyurl.com/yd9bz3ej The Cultural Thought of Ludwig von Mises https://tinyurl.com/y7y8kbgo The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics https://tinyurl.com/y8z4sf59 Mises's Epistemology https://tinyurl.com/ycna45o9 The Philosophical Contributions of Ludwig von Mises http://tinyurl.com/yc9u4ju7 The Austrian Theory of Money https://tinyurl.com/y8gqjnwr The Austrian School's Critique of Marxism http://tinyurl.com/y84g9g7j Money, Method, and the Market Process https://tinyurl.com/ydaypg2k Economic Calculation http://tinyurl.com/y5gzqd9q Epistemological Relativism in the Sciences of Human Action https://tinyurl.com/y986vfvj Economic Freedom and Interventionism https://tinyurl.com/yau35t2o The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality https://tinyurl.com/qbwery7 Marxism Unmasked: From Delusion to Destruction https://tinyurl.com/y8og9r4f Individualism and Civilization https://tinyurl.com/yauloqdr Capitalism, Happiness, and Beauty https://tinyurl.com/yao35ywc Liberty and Property https://tinyurl.com/y7b8ta5h Middle-of-the-Road Policy Leads to Socialism https://tinyurl.com/ybdexds8 The Free Market and Its Enemies https://tinyurl.com/nky7aco Liberalism: In the Classical Tradition https://tinyurl.com/y7bp83ej Nation, State, and Economy https://tinyurl.com/ycjere4t Ludwig von Mises: Defender of Capitalism https://tinyurl.com/ycplhhwj Individuals, Reason, and Action https://tinyurl.com/yajwd9s8 The Propaganda War Against Capitalism https://tinyurl.com/y6vn9fs7 Individualism and Economic Order http://tinyurl.com/ydehz4s9 On the Origins of Money http://tinyurl.com/y6yu6aws Principles of Economics http://tinyurl.com/yyzc8hts Investigations Into the Method of the Social Sciences http://tinyurl.com/y3tt6wth The Positive Theory of Capital http://tinyurl.com/y5rnbdbn Value, Cost, and Marginal Utility http://tinyurl.com/y2ry5jrw * * * * * DISCLAIMER: This media presentation is owned by the Ludwig von Mises Institute and is protected under Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with the Mises Institute, any of its scholars or staff members.
Views: 2555 LibertyInOurTime
Complementary monopoly | Wikipedia audio article
 
05:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complementary_monopoly 00:00:57 Example Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.903358180672292 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In a complementary monopoly is an economic concept. It considers a situation where consent must be obtained from more than one agent to obtain a good. In turn leading to a reduction in surplus generated relative to an outright monopoly, if the two agents do not cooperate. The theory was originally proposed in the nineteenth century by Antoine Augustin Cournot.This can be seen in private toll roads where more than one operator controls a different section of the road. The solution is for one agent to purchase all sections of the road. Complementary goods are a less extreme form of this effect. In this case, one good is still of value even if the other good is not obtained. In a 1968 paper Hugo F. Sonnenschein claim complementary monopoly is equivalent to Cournot duopoly.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Monopoly | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:08:09
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopoly 00:02:42 1 Market structures 00:04:53 2 Characteristics 00:05:52 3 Sources of monopoly power 00:09:56 4 Monopoly versus competitive markets 00:13:22 5 The inverse elasticity rule 00:13:34 5.1 Market power 00:13:41 6 Price discrimination 00:15:38 6.1 Example 00:17:41 6.2 Classifying customers 00:20:44 7 Monopoly and efficiency 00:21:56 7.1 Natural monopoly 00:23:41 7.2 Government-granted monopoly 00:33:41 8 Monopolist shutdown rule 00:34:44 9 Breaking up monopolies 00:35:02 10 Law 00:35:11 10.1 Establishing Dominance 00:35:54 10.1.1 Relevant Product Market 00:36:05 10.1.2 Relevant Geographic Market 00:38:05 10.1.3 Market shares 00:38:14 10.1.4 Other Related Factors 00:40:31 10.2 Types of Abuses 00:40:41 10.3 Examples of Abuses 00:41:18 11 Historical monopolies 00:41:29 11.1 Origin 00:42:04 11.2 Monopolies of resources 00:43:22 11.2.1 Salt 00:44:31 11.2.2 Coal 00:45:08 11.2.3 Petroleum 00:46:00 11.2.4 Steel 00:46:58 11.2.5 Diamonds 00:49:32 11.3 Utilities 00:51:00 11.4 Transportation 00:52:01 11.5 Foreign trade 00:52:43 11.6 Professional sports 00:52:53 11.7 Other examples of monopolies 00:53:33 12 Countering monopolies 00:53:43 13 See also 00:55:02 14 Notes and references 00:56:00 15 Further reading 00:57:06 16 External links 00:57:55 Diamonds 00:59:42 Utilities 01:01:26 Transportation 01:02:24 Foreign trade 01:03:11 Professional sports 01:03:40 Other examples of monopolies 01:05:14 Countering monopolies 01:07:05 See also 01:07:14 Notes and references 01:07:44 Further reading 01:07:53 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8928171818745078 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A monopoly (from Greek μόνος mónos ["alone" or "single"] and πωλεῖν pōleîn ["to sell"]) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity. This contrasts with a monopsony which relates to a single entity's control of a market to purchase a good or service, and with oligopoly which consists of a few sellers dominating a market. Monopolies are thus characterized by a lack of economic competition to produce the good or service, a lack of viable substitute goods, and the possibility of a high monopoly price well above the seller's marginal cost that leads to a high monopoly profit. The verb monopolise or monopolize refers to the process by which a company gains the ability to raise prices or exclude competitors. In economics, a monopoly is a single seller. In law, a monopoly is a business entity that has significant market power, that is, the power to charge overly high prices. Although monopolies may be big businesses, size is not a characteristic of a monopoly. A small business may still have the power to raise prices in a small industry (or market).A monopoly is distinguished from a monopsony, in which there is only one buyer of a product or service; a monopoly may also have monopsony control of a sector of a market. Likewise, a monopoly should be distinguished from a cartel (a form of oligopoly), in which several providers act together to coordinate services, prices or sale of goods. Monopolies, monopsonies and oligopolies are all situations in which one or a few entities have market power and therefore interact with their customers (monopoly or oligopoly), or suppliers (monopsony) in ways that distort the market.Monopolies can be established by a government, form naturally, or form by integration. In many jurisdictions, competition laws restrict monopolies. Holding a dominant position or a monopoly in a market is often not illegal in itself, however certain categories of behavior can be considered abusive and therefore incur legal sanctions when business is dominant. A government-granted monopoly or legal monopoly, by contrast, is sanctioned by the state, often to provide an incentive to invest in a risky venture or enrich a dom ...
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Fractal Economics 9 Knowledge, Market Intervention, and Monopoly
 
09:55
Continuing with my discoveries from the fractal with relation to economics. This time intervention and imperfect information. https://www.academia.edu/32375016/Quantum_Mechanics_Information_and_Knowledge_all_Aspects_of_Fractal_Geometry_and_Revealed_in_an_Understanding_of_Marginal_Economics https://figshare.com/articles/Marginal_Fractal/3167752
Views: 15 Blair Macdonald
Monopoly (game) | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:11:42
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopoly_(game) 00:01:18 1 History 00:01:27 1.1 Early history 00:03:54 1.2 1936–1970 00:04:36 1.3 1970s–80s 00:05:45 1.4 Hasbro ownership 00:07:29 2 Board 00:08:01 2.1 U.S. versions 00:12:08 2.2 UK version 00:15:20 2.3 Post-2005 variations 00:17:12 2.3.1 iMonopoly Here and Now/i 00:19:53 2.3.2 iMonopoly Empire/i 00:21:49 3 Equipment 00:22:07 3.1 Cards 00:22:26 3.2 Deeds 00:23:52 3.3 Dice 00:24:29 3.4 Houses and hotels 00:25:01 3.5 Money 00:26:42 3.5.1 International currencies 00:27:38 3.5.2 Extra currency 00:28:29 3.5.3 Electronic banking 00:28:53 3.6 Tokens 00:29:01 3.6.1 Classic 00:32:34 3.6.2 Special editions 00:33:41 4 Rules 00:33:49 4.1 Official rules 00:35:29 4.1.1 Chance/Community Chest 00:36:00 4.1.2 Jail 00:37:37 4.1.3 Properties 00:38:56 4.1.4 Mortgaging 00:39:50 4.1.5 Bankruptcy 00:41:04 4.2 Official Short Game rules 00:41:42 4.3 House rules 00:43:02 5 Strategy 00:43:57 5.1 End game 00:44:44 6 Related games 00:44:54 6.1 Add-ons 00:45:12 6.1.1 iStock Exchange/i 00:47:11 6.1.2 Playmaster 00:47:51 6.1.3 iGet Out of Jail/i and iFree Parking/i Minigames 00:48:35 6.1.4 Speed Die 00:50:22 6.2 Spin-offs 00:52:54 6.3 Video games 00:54:07 6.4 Gambling games 00:55:04 7 Media 00:55:13 7.1 Commercial promotions 00:55:46 7.2 Television game show 00:57:31 7.3 Films 00:59:11 8 Tournaments 00:59:20 8.1 U.S. National Championship 01:01:42 8.2 World Championship 01:02:36 9 Variants 01:05:23 9.1 Games by locale or theme 01:06:22 9.2 Unauthorized and parody games 01:06:42 9.3 World editions 01:08:41 9.4 Deluxe editions 01:10:27 10 Reception 01:11:21 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Monopoly is a board game in which players roll two six-sided dice to move around the game board, buying and trading properties, and developing them with houses and hotels. Players collect rent from their opponents, with the goal being to drive them into bankruptcy. Money can also be gained or lost through Chance and Community Chest cards, and tax squares; players can end up in jail, which they cannot move from until they have met one of several conditions. The game has numerous house rules, and hundreds of different editions exist, as well as many spin-offs and related media. Monopoly has become a part of international popular culture, having been licensed locally in more than 103 countries and printed in more than thirty-seven languages. Monopoly is derived from The Landlord's Game created by Elizabeth Magie in the United States in 1903 as a way to demonstrate that an economy which rewards wealth creation is better than one where monopolists work under few constraints, and to promote the economic theories of Henry George—in particular his ideas about taxation. It was first published by Parker Brothers in 1935. The game is named after the economic concept of monopoly—the domination of a market by a single entity. It is now owned and produced by the American game and toy company Hasbro.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
When money isn’t real: the $10,000 experiment | Adam Carroll | TEDxLondonBusinessSchool
 
15:41
Adam Carroll talks about his $10,000 Monopoly game with his kids and how to teach finance management in a cashless society. Adam Carroll is quickly being recognized as one of the top transformational trainers in the country. Having presented at over 500 colleges and Universities nationwide, hundreds of leadership symposiums, and countless local and regional organizations, Adam Carroll’s message of Building A Bigger Life, Not a Bigger Lifestyle has been heard by over 200,000+ people. In early 2014, Adam successfully crowd-funded a documentary on student loan debt, raising nearly $70,000 in 45 days. The film, Broke Busted & Disgusted is due out in early 2015 and is already garnering critical acclaim. The mission of the film is to start a national debate about changing the way we fund college and not crippling 20 somethings with mountains of debt. Adam’s core message is we are all after the same thing – to relentlessly pursue our passions, live simply and happily, and make a difference to those around us. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 3801450 TEDx Talks
Does America Have a Monopoly Problem? What the Numbers Show
 
53:51
The Lessons from Inequality The Lessons from Growth and Profits The Lessons from Independent Business The Lessons from Jobs In recent months, Americans have witnessed a burst of interest in a problem that most of us assumed was fixed long ago –monopolies. The Economist has chided the U.S. government for failing to enforce laws designed to prevent monopolies and promote competition. The White House released an unprecedented Executive Order calling for agencies to take steps to encourage competition. The Senate antitrust subcommittee held a lively hearing in which leaders from both parties agreed that antitrust enforcement agencies are not doing enough to defend competition in America. Meanwhile, scholars ranging from Paul Krugman to Joseph Stiglitz have linked the return of monopoly to many of America’s biggest problems, including inequality, declining growth, and reduced job mobility. More: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/events/americas-monopoly-problem/ Join New America’s Open Markets Program for a discussion exploring the growth of concentration in the American economy, its effects on American economic and political life, and potential solutions to restore and protect competition in America. The discussion will include panels with distinguished antitrust and competition policy experts and a keynote speech by The Honorable Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). To find a selected list of further reading for the event, organized by topic: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/americas-monopoly-problem-further-reading/ To find a timeline of antitrust, big data, and privacy issues in the European Union: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/antitrust-big-data-and-privacy-europe-timeline/ The Open Markets Program is also co-sponsoring a related discussion on June 30 at the National Press Club, hosted by our partner The Capitol Forum. ==================================== New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences. Subscribe to our channel for new videos on a wide range of policy issues: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=newamericafoundation Subscribe to The New America Weekly and other newsletters: http://www.newamerica.org/subscribe/#
Views: 1160 New America
A2 Economics - Monopoly Diagram Explained
 
08:24
In this short video, I take a look at the Monopoly market structure and analyse the diagram. This diagram is useful when answering analysis and evaluation questions on the exam. A deeper understanding will provide useful for higher evaluation marks.
Views: 10755 Junaid Ahmed
Price Discrimination In Hindi कीमत विभेदीकरण क्या है
 
16:12
The term “Price Discrimination” is also known as differential Pricing, Preferential Pricing, Dual Pricing, tiered Pricing, or Menu Pricing etc. What is “Price Discrimination” Price discrimination is a pricing strategy that charges customers different prices for the same product or service. The difference in the product may be on the basis of brand, wrapper etc. This policy of the monopolist is called price discrimination. Definitions: “Price discrimination exists when the same product is sold at different prices to different buyers.” –Koutsoyiannis “Price discrimination refers to the sale of technically similar products at prices which are not proportional to their marginal cost.” -Stigler “Price discrimination is the act of selling the same article produced under single control at a different price to the different buyers.” -Mrs. Joan Robinson “Price discrimination refers strictly to the practice by a seller of charging different prices from different buyers for the same good.” -J.S. Bain “Discriminating monopoly means charging different rates from different customers for the same good or service.” -Dooley Types of Discriminating Monopoly: Price discrimination is of following three types: 1. Personal Price Discrimination: Personal price discrimination refers to the charging of different prices from different customers for the same product. For example, an advocate charges different fees for the same service from rich and poor client. 2. Geographical Price Discrimination: Under geographical price discrimination, the monopolist charges different prices in different markets for the same product. It also includes dumping where a producer may sell the same commodity at one price at home and at the other price abroad. 3. Price Discrimination according to Use: When the monopolist charges different prices for the different uses of the same commodity is called the price discrimination according to use. Degree of Price Discrimination: Prof. A.C. Pigou has given the following three degrees of discriminating monopoly: 1. Price Discrimination of First Degree: Price discrimination of first degree is said to exist when the monopolist is able to sell each separate unit of his product at different prices. It is also known as the perfect price discrimination. In case of first degree price discrimination, a seller charges a price equal to what the consumer is willing to pay. It means the seller leaves no consumer’s surplus with the consumer. Apart from above, under perfect price discrimination the demand curve of the buyer, like under simple monopoly, becomes the marginal revenue curve of the seller. 2. Price Discrimination of Second Degree: In the price discrimination of second degree buyers are divided into different groups and from different groups a different price is charged which is the lowest demand price of that group. This type of price discrimination would occur if each individual buyer had a perfectly in- elastic demand curve for good below and above a certain price. 3. Price Discrimination of Third Degree: Price discrimination of third degree is said to exist when the seller divides his buyers into two or more than two sub markets and from each group a different price is charged. The price charged in each sub-market depends on the output sold in that sub-market along with demand conditions of that sub-market. In the real world, it is the third degree price discrimination which exists. 4. Legal Sanction: In some cases price discrimination is legally sanctioned. As, Electricity Board charges lowest for electricity for domestic use and highest for commercial houses. 5. Monopoly Existence: Price discrimination is also called discrimination monopoly. It is evident that price discrimination is possible only under conditions of monopoly.
Views: 10569 Know Economics
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MONOPOLY AND OLIGOPOLY
 
03:39
Thanks For Watching Subscribe to become a part of #Gyanpost Like, Comment, Share and Enjoy the videos. We are on a mission of providing a Free, World-class Education for anyone, anywhere and offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on all academic subjects. SUBSCRIBE for awesome videos every day!:
Views: 39 Gyan Post
The Short Run versus The Long Run
 
06:30
This video outlines the economic distinction between the short run and the long run. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 229979 jodiecongirl
Why Is Costco Opening Its Own Chicken Farm?
 
08:30
In fall 2019, Costco will open a chicken farming operation in eastern Nebraska. This venture will provide Costco with 100 million chickens, or 40 percent of its yearly chicken needs, allowing it to partially escape the American chicken oligopoly run by the likes of Tyson, Pilgrim's Pride and Perdue. One of the brand's iconic products is the Costco rotisserie chicken. Costco sells about 60 million of them every year, but they're a loss leader. Costco sells these chickens at a loss sometimes up to 30 to 40 million dollars per year. The chickens are a lure to get customers in the door. They're placed strategically at the back of every Costco so customers might pick up other items along the way. That's why Costco wants to keep the price so low. The trouble is that chicken prices have crept up over the last 10 years and the industry is practically an oligopoly run by the likes of Tyson and Perdue. Costco like most American Grocers buys from these behemoth companies because there's no other option. But not anymore. In 2016 Costco announced its plans to open a chicken farming operation in eastern Nebraska. It will own the whole supply chain from baby chicks to feed to the final product. This operation will provide Costco with 40 percent of its yearly chicken needs about 100 million chickens. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC #Costco Why Is Costco Opening Its Own Chicken Farm?
Views: 1468190 CNBC
What is MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE? What does MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE mean' MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE meaning
 
06:33
What is MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE? What does MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE mean' MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE meaning - MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE definition - MONOPOLY ON VIOLENCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force, also known as the monopoly on violence (German: Gewaltmonopol des Staates), is a core concept of modern public law, which goes back to Jean Bodin's 1576 work Les Six livres de la République and Thomas Hobbes' 1651 book Leviathan. As the defining conception of the state, it was first described in sociology by Max Weber in his essay Politics as a Vocation (1919). Weber claims that the state is the "only human Gemeinschaft which lays claim to the monopoly on the legitimated use of physical force. However, this monopoly is limited to a certain geographical area, and in fact this limitation to a particular area is one of the things that defines a state." In other words, Weber describes the state as any organization that succeeds in holding the exclusive right to use, threaten, or authorize physical force against residents of its territory. Such a monopoly, according to Weber, must occur via a process of legitimation. Max Weber wrote in Politics as a Vocation that a fundamental characteristic of statehood is the claim of such a monopoly, His expanded definition was that something is "a 'state' if and insofar as its administrative staff successfully upholds a claim on the 'monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force' (German: das Monopol legitimen physischen Zwanges) in the enforcement of its order." Weber's concept has been formalized to show that the exclusive policing power of the state benefits social welfare, provided the state acts benevolently in the interest of its citizens. According to Weber, the state is that "human community that (successfully) claims the monopoly of the legitimate use of violence within a given territory." The public police and military are its main instruments, but private security might also be considered to have "the 'right' to use violence" so long as the sole source of this perceived right is state sanction. Weber applied several caveats to his discussion of the state's monopoly of violence: He intended the statement as a contemporary observation, noting that the connection between the state and the use of physical force has not always been so close. He uses the examples of feudalism, where private warfare was permitted under certain conditions, and of religious courts, which had sole jurisdiction over some types of offenses, especially heresy and sex crimes (thus the nickname "bawdy courts"). Regardless, the state exists wherever a single authority can legitimately authorize violence. For the same reasons, the "monopoly" does not mean that only the government may use physical force, but that the state is that human community that successfully claims for itself to be the only source of legitimacy for all physical coercion or adjudication of coercion. For example, the law might permit individuals to use force in defense of one's self or property, but this right derives from the state's authority. This obviously contradicts directly with enlightenment principles of individual sovereignty that delegates power to the state by consent, and concepts of Natural Law that hold that individual rights deriving from sapient Self Ownership preexist the state and are only recognised and guaranteed by the state which may be restricted from limiting them by Constitutional Law.....
Views: 2384 The Audiopedia
Richard Wolff - Is Amazon the #1 Threat To Jobs?
 
11:52
Big Picture Interview: Professor Richard Wolff, Capitalism's Crisis Deepens Essays on the Global Economic Meltdown/Democracy At Work. Amazon is one of the most successful American businesses of the past few decades. But is it also the number one threat to American jobs? Plus - Prof. Wolff talks about the "Social Explosion” about to happen. For more information on the stories we've covered visit our websites at thomhartmann.com - freespeech.org - and RT.com. You can also watch tonight's show on Hulu - at Hulu.com/THE BIG PICTURE and over at The Big Picture YouTube page. And - be sure to check us out on Facebook and Twitter!
Views: 51764 The Big Picture RT
Other People's Data:  Monopoly and Discrimination
 
51:32
A Price Just for You – Discrimination in the Era of Big Data Introduction to Europe’s New General Data Protection Regulation The FCC’s Proposed Privacy Rules for ISPs Algorithms and Race In recent months, Americans have witnessed a burst of interest in a problem that most of us assumed was fixed long ago –monopolies. The Economist has chided the U.S. government for failing to enforce laws designed to prevent monopolies and promote competition. The White House released an unprecedented Executive Order calling for agencies to take steps to encourage competition. The Senate antitrust subcommittee held a lively hearing in which leaders from both parties agreed that antitrust enforcement agencies are not doing enough to defend competition in America. Meanwhile, scholars ranging from Paul Krugman to Joseph Stiglitz have linked the return of monopoly to many of America’s biggest problems, including inequality, declining growth, and reduced job mobility. More: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/events/americas-monopoly-problem/ Join New America’s Open Markets Program for a discussion exploring the growth of concentration in the American economy, its effects on American economic and political life, and potential solutions to restore and protect competition in America. The discussion will include panels with distinguished antitrust and competition policy experts and a keynote speech by The Honorable Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). To find a selected list of further reading for the event, organized by topic: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/americas-monopoly-problem-further-reading/ To find a timeline of antitrust, big data, and privacy issues in the European Union: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/antitrust-big-data-and-privacy-europe-timeline/ The Open Markets Program is also co-sponsoring a related discussion on June 30 at the National Press Club, hosted by our partner The Capitol Forum. ==================================== New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences. Subscribe to our channel for new videos on a wide range of policy issues: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=newamericafoundation Subscribe to The New America Weekly and other newsletters: http://www.newamerica.org/subscribe/#
Views: 318 New America
ASMR Math: Visualizing Disruptive Innovation, Monopolies, and Mergers and Acquisitions (Economics)
 
32:26
If you would like to support this work then please visit my Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/chycho You can also make direct donation through Paypal at: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=TXHUBMRN5AZ3Q Thank you for your support. ***Key Terms*** Disruptive innovation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disruptive_innovation Mergers and acquisitions https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mergers_and_acquisitions Monopolies https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopoly The Surprising History of Copyright and The Promise of a Post-Copyright World http://questioncopyright.org/promise Differential Accumulation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_accumulation ***PLAYLISTS*** ASMR - Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxnwlqICKHXy7lanHb4Vy0xl ASMR Math https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxk8C_ZQHCjY5XrQS9SYkEBD Trigonometry https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxmSHtqSPAHfjNYu0OpIFWhp The Language of Mathematics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFA0678B6777BA250 Math in Real Life https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE313AE0850B34951 Politics/Economics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL428D448DDF6F6150 Comic Books https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxnxixuAMr-_mqJHaEFZ8ugb Beards https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3BE5BA1835DF9819 Backgammon https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxmnpQCIWhkInx4SIk1craYM How to Study https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxllvFO3yJEI3Yt_GrroR882 Music: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3A91A1E32AC88A3C In Conversation with chycho: Q&A https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxm7w9P9m9kmbNy05abYpe4f How to Make Crab Apple Butter, Crabapple Spread https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxkvKlhVE1-R8Q1Cpox4V2ax Food https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxmGPa6kjbtCkjFxPqT62E-O How to Eat Pomegranates https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9sfzC9bUPxngqSUawyN-ih7OixNPTgEH ***Additional Math Channels*** Math in Real Life (www.mathinreallife.com) https://www.youtube.com/user/mathinreallife 420math (www.420math.com) https://www.youtube.com/user/420math420math ***Additional Articles*** "For the ASMR Community: Extended Cuts of Picking My Beard" http://chycho.blogspot.ca/2013/01/for-asmr-community-extended-cuts-of.html Articles on Mathematics - "Math Articles" http://chycho.blogspot.ca/2014/04/table-of-contents-main.html#TOCMath: Peace, chycho http://www.chycho.com .
Views: 8260 chycho
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MONOPOLY COMPETITION AND MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION
 
03:09
Thanks For Watching Subscribe to become a part of #Gyanpost Like, Comment, Share and Enjoy the videos. We are on a mission of providing a Free, World-class Education for anyone, anywhere and offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on all academic subjects. SUBSCRIBE for awesome videos every day!:
Views: 25 Gyan Post
"Decoupling" the Economy is Horseshit. (UN, WTF?!)
 
11:01
Support the show! Become a Patreon- https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5385111 One-time tip/donation: https://www.paypal.me/MexieYT ___ Follow - Twitter: https://twitter.com/mexieYT Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mexieYT IG: @_mexie_ Check out my podcast (co-hosted with Marine from A Privileged Vegan): https://www.veganvanguardpodcast.com ___ Our global institutions want to sell us fantasies that infinite capitalist growth is sustainable. Wrong all along: Neoliberal IMF admits neoliberalism fuels inequality and hurts growth: http://www.salon.com/2016/05/31/wrong_all_along_neoliberal_imf_admits_neoliberalism_fuels_inequality_and_hurts_growth/ Decoupling Article (Fletcher and Rammelt): http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14747731.2016.1263077?journalCode=rglo20 Other Critiques: https://www.degrowth.de/en/2016/03/once-again-supposed-evidence-for-decoupling-emissions-from-growth-is-not-what-it-seems/ https://steadystatemanchester.net/2016/04/15/new-evidence-on-decoupling-carbon-emissions-from-gdp-growth-what-does-it-mean/ https://www.amazon.ca/Prosperity-without-Growth-Economics-Finite/dp/1849713235 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0164733 A Privileged Vegan: Why Veganism Must be Anti-Capitalist (NOW!!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbT2y8VR7WE&t=60s
Views: 8899 Mexie
Senator Elizabeth Warren Keynote | America's Monopoly Problem
 
33:21
In recent months, Americans have witnessed a burst of interest in a problem that most of us assumed was fixed long ago –monopolies. The Economist has chided the U.S. government for failing to enforce laws designed to prevent monopolies and promote competition. The White House released an unprecedented Executive Order calling for agencies to take steps to encourage competition. The Senate antitrust subcommittee held a lively hearing in which leaders from both parties agreed that antitrust enforcement agencies are not doing enough to defend competition in America. Meanwhile, scholars ranging from Paul Krugman to Joseph Stiglitz have linked the return of monopoly to many of America’s biggest problems, including inequality, declining growth, and reduced job mobility. More: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/events/americas-monopoly-problem/ Join New America’s Open Markets Program for a discussion exploring the growth of concentration in the American economy, its effects on American economic and political life, and potential solutions to restore and protect competition in America. The discussion will include panels with distinguished antitrust and competition policy experts and a keynote speech by The Honorable Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). To find a selected list of further reading for the event, organized by topic: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/americas-monopoly-problem-further-reading/ To find a timeline of antitrust, big data, and privacy issues in the European Union: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/antitrust-big-data-and-privacy-europe-timeline/ The Open Markets Program is also co-sponsoring a related discussion on June 30 at the National Press Club, hosted by our partner The Capitol Forum. ==================================== New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences. Subscribe to our channel for new videos on a wide range of policy issues: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=newamericafoundation Subscribe to The New America Weekly and other newsletters: http://www.newamerica.org/subscribe/#
Views: 4728 New America
Other People's News and Ideas: Monopoly and the Flow of Information
 
01:06:06
Journalism in the Age of Facebook and Google Books and Music in the Age of Amazon and YouTube In recent months, Americans have witnessed a burst of interest in a problem that most of us assumed was fixed long ago –monopolies. The Economist has chided the U.S. government for failing to enforce laws designed to prevent monopolies and promote competition. The White House released an unprecedented Executive Order calling for agencies to take steps to encourage competition. The Senate antitrust subcommittee held a lively hearing in which leaders from both parties agreed that antitrust enforcement agencies are not doing enough to defend competition in America. Meanwhile, scholars ranging from Paul Krugman to Joseph Stiglitz have linked the return of monopoly to many of America’s biggest problems, including inequality, declining growth, and reduced job mobility. More: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/events/americas-monopoly-problem/ Join New America’s Open Markets Program for a discussion exploring the growth of concentration in the American economy, its effects on American economic and political life, and potential solutions to restore and protect competition in America. The discussion will include panels with distinguished antitrust and competition policy experts and a keynote speech by The Honorable Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). To find a selected list of further reading for the event, organized by topic: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/americas-monopoly-problem-further-reading/ To find a timeline of antitrust, big data, and privacy issues in the European Union: http://www.newamerica.org/open-markets/articles/antitrust-big-data-and-privacy-europe-timeline/ The Open Markets Program is also co-sponsoring a related discussion on June 30 at the National Press Club, hosted by our partner The Capitol Forum. ==================================== New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences. Subscribe to our channel for new videos on a wide range of policy issues: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=newamericafoundation Subscribe to The New America Weekly and other newsletters: http://www.newamerica.org/subscribe/#
Views: 250 New America
Taxes on Producers- Microeconomics 2.11 ACDC Econ
 
05:58
I explain excise taxes any show what happens to consumer surplus, producer surplus, and deadweight loss as a result of a tax. Make sure to watch the section about tax incidence and who pays the majority of a tax.
Views: 642363 Jacob Clifford
That Time a Video Game had an Economy Almost as Strong as Russia
 
11:14
Dashlane! 10% off with the coupon code "brainfood": http://www.dashlane.com/brainfood If you happen to like our videos and have a few bucks to spare to support our efforts, check out our Patreon page where we've got a variety of perks for our Patrons, including Simon's voice on your GPS and the ever requested Simon Whistler whistling package: https://www.patreon.com/TodayIFoundOut This video is sponsored by Dashlane. →Some of our favorites: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR0XuDegDqP10d4vrztQ0fVzNnTiQBEAA →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 Follow Simon on social media: https://twitter.com/SimonWhistler https://www.instagram.com/simonwhistler/ Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut: Who Invented the Internet and What Did Al Gore Actually Have to Do With It? https://youtu.be/HpMgne-X-Ns When Aluminium Cost More than Gold... https://youtu.be/4xsj2O_fRnc In this video: In late 2001 an economist called Edward Castronova made tsunami sized waves in the world of economics when he published a paper claiming that an isolated place called Norrath had a currency stronger than that of the Japanese Yen- an especially bold claim considering Norrath had less than a million inhabitants, had only existed for about two years and didn’t exist physically. Yes, Norrath was entirely virtual and populated exclusively by players of the video game EverQuest. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2019/03/that-time-a-video-game-had-an-economy-almost-as-strong-as-russia/ Sources: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=nYyJAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA232&dq=everquest+economy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwia78vSzIzaAhVCWsAKHV_sBBIQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=everquest%20economy&f=false http://www.slate.com/articles/business/the_dismal_science/2003/02/fantasy_economics.html https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=319121006065082088009097075099108104024074007011089060073094000006097029114042099028119062042100064115126025015012036003050068008103093118075031113102121110053087086072000074069027109087030016096109091000086094088106069121005117072094017112009&EXT=pdf http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1899420.stm https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=QCmBDAAAQBAJ&pg=PA58&dq=everquest+economy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiU-ae3y4zaAhVqJcAKHVfRCDkQ6AEIUzAI#v=onepage&q=everquest%20economy&f=false https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=r36qpCjBIuMC&pg=PA209&dq=everquest+economy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwia78vSzIzaAhVCWsAKHV_sBBIQ6AEILjAB#v=onepage&q=everquest%20economy&f=false https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=r36qpCjBIuMC&pg=PA209&dq=everquest+economy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwia78vSzIzaAhVCWsAKHV_sBBIQ6AEILjAB#v=onepage&q=everquest%20economy&f=false https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=LXGL9iBAzpYC&pg=PA297&dq=everquest+economy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwia78vSzIzaAhVCWsAKHV_sBBIQ6AEINDAC#v=onepage&q=everquest%20economy&f=false https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_economy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EverQuest https://psmag.com/economics/the-real-value-of-virtual-economies-eve-world-of-warcraft-64593 https://www.theregister.co.uk/2001/02/12/whatever_happened_to_the_everquest/ https://thewalrus.ca/game-theories/ https://www.policygenius.com/blog/world-of-warcraft-video-game-economy/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2012/09/28/the-economics-of-video-games/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.9d028943d4b8 https://www.citylab.com/life/2014/09/what-can-we-learn-from-the-wealth-of-virtual-nations/379538/
Views: 540308 Today I Found Out
Episode 22: Hurricane Economics
 
31:03
Hurricane Florence was descending upon the US east coast as this FEEcast was recorded. The panel, along with guest Jon Miltimore, FEE.org’s managing editor, discuss the economics of hurricanes. It turns out economic laws still apply during natural disasters. The FEEcasters discuss the “Broken Window Fallacy,” the issue of “price gouging,” and more. Show Notes: Hurricanes Have No Silver Lining https://fee.org/articles/hurricane-matthew-has-no-silver-lining/ Hurricanes Don’t Blow Away Economic Law https://fee.org/articles/hurricanes-don-t-blow-away-economic-law/ How Price Gouging Helped My Family During a Storm https://fee.org/articles/how-price-gouging-helped-my-family-during-a-storm/